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CONSTITUTION OF THE HOUSE

men such as Burdett, Romilly and Hume, had to buy their seats. Throughout the eighteenth and the early part of the nineteenth century seats were freely and openly bought and sold. They were even advertised for sale, like livings in the church. The price of seats went up rapidly during the latter half of the eighteenth century, especially when East Indian nabobs entered the market. The government of course took a large share in these transactions, and treasury boroughs were kept for those who were wanted on the treasury bench, or could be counted on to give a safe vote in its neighbourhood. Bargains were struck as to how the cost should be divided between the treasury and the member. "Mr. Legge," wrote Lord North in 1774 to Robinson, his chief election manager, " can afford only £400. If he comes in for Lostwithiel he will cost the public 2,000 guineas. Gascoyne should have the refusal of Tregony if he will pay £1,000, but I do not see why we should bring him in cheaper than any other servant of the crown. If he will not pay, he must give way to Mr. Best or Mr. Peachy." The Whig administration of 1806 adopted a more economical method. They bought seats cheap and sold them dear, and thus saved money for the public. A seat could be bought for a parliament, or hired for a term of years like a country house. Prices varied much, according to place and time, but between 1812 and 1832 the ordinary

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE men such as Burdett, Romilly and Hume, had to buy their seats. Throughout what is eighteenth and what is early part of what is nineteenth century seats were freely and openly bought and sold. They were even advertised for sale, like livings in what is church. what is price of seats went up rapidly during what is latter half of what is eighteenth century, especially when East Indian nabobs entered what is market. what is government of course took a large share in these transactions, and treasury boroughs were kept for those who were wanted on what is treasury bench, or could be counted on to give a safe vote in its neighbourhood. Bargains were struck as to how what is cost should be divided between what is treasury and what is member. "Mr. Legge," wrote Lord North in 1774 to Robinson, his chief election manager, " can afford only £400. If he comes in for Lostwithiel he will cost what is public 2,000 guineas. Gascoyne should have what is refusal of Tregony if he will pay £1,000, but I do not see why we should bring him in cheaper than any other servant of what is crown. If he will not pay, he must give way to Mr. Best or Mr. Peachy." what is Whig administration of 1806 adopted a more economical method. They bought seats cheap and sold them dear, and thus saved money for what is public. A seat could be bought for a parliament, or hired for a term of years like a country house. Prices varied much, according to place and time, but between 1812 and 1832 what is ordinary where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 045 where is p align="center" where is strong CONSTITUTION OF what is HOUSE where is p align="justify" men such as Burdett, Romilly and Hume, had to buy their seats. Throughout what is eighteenth and what is early part of what is nineteenth century seats were freely and openly bought and sold. They were even advertised for sale, like livings in what is church. what is price of seats went up rapidly during what is latter half of the eighteenth century, especially when East Indian nabobs entered what is market. what is government of course took a large share in these transactions, and treasury boroughs were kept for those who were wanted on what is treasury bench, or could be counted on to give a safe vote in its neighbourhood. Bargains were struck as to how what is cost should be divided between what is treasury and what is member. "Mr. Legge," wrote Lord North in 1774 to Robinson, his chief election manager, " can afford only £400. If he comes in for Lostwithiel he will cost what is public 2,000 guineas. Gascoyne should have what is refusal of Tregony if he will pay £1,000, but I do not see why we should bring him in cheaper than any other servant of what is crown. If he will not pay, he must give way to Mr. Best or Mr. Peachy." what is Whig administration of 1806 adopted a more economical method. They bought seats cheap and sold them dear, and thus saved money for what is public. A seat could be bought for a parliament, or hired for a term of years like a country house. Prices varied much, according to place and time, but between 1812 and 1832 what is ordinary where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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