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Page 043

CONSTITUTION OF THE HOUSE

Croker, who knew the house of commons during the first quarter of the last century as well as any one, put the members returned by patrons at 276 out of 658. Before the union with Ireland increased the number of members by 100 the proportion was probably greater, for the number of nomination seats in Ireland did not exceed twenty. It has been estimated that from about 1760 to 1832 nearly one-half of the members of the house of commons owed their seats to patrons. Gladstone once eulogized nomination boroughs as a means of bringing young men of promise into the house, and Bagehot went so far as to describe them as an organ for specialized political thought. But a study of electoral statistics and parliamentary history tends to show that the young men of promise who were given a comparatively free hand were rare, and that the tie between the nominated member and his patron was much less romantic and more prosaic and practical than as conceived by Bagehot. A nominee member was usually expected to obey his patron's orders, and to study his interests. In 1810 a younger brother, who had been put into parliament by his senior, was reprimanded for neglecting the family interests. "As to my being justifiable in thus abandoning the interests of my family, after all the money that has been spent to bring me into parliament," he writes in reply, " I have only to answer that the money so spent has, I think,

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is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 043 where is p align="center" where is strong CONSTITUTION OF what is HOUSE where is p align="justify" Croker, who knew what is house of commons during the first quarter of what is last century as well as any one, put what is members returned by patrons at 276 out of 658. Before what is union with Ireland increased what is number of members by 100 what is proportion was probably greater, for what is number of nomination seats in Ireland did not exceed twenty. It has been estimated that from about 1760 to 1832 nearly one-half of what is members of what is house of commons owed their seats to patrons. Gladstone once eulogized nomination boroughs as a means of bringing young men of promise into what is house, and Bagehot went so far as to describe them as an organ for specialized political thought. But a study of electoral statistics and parliamentary history tends to show that what is young men of promise who were given a comparatively free hand were rare, and that what is tie between the nominated member and his patron was much less romantic and more prosaic and practical than as conceived by Bagehot. A nominee member was usually expected to obey his patron's orders, and to study his interests. In 1810 a younger brother, who had been put into parliament by his senior, was reprimanded for neglecting what is family interests. "As to my being justifiable in thus abandoning what is interests of my family, after all what is money that has been spent to bring me into parliament," he writes in reply, " I have only to answer that what is money so spent has, I think, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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