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Page 026

ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT

effect to her wishes. Before Henry VIII the life of parliament was usually comprised within a single session, and the sessions were short. Parliaments now grew longer. Henry VIII's Reformation parliament lasted for seven years. One of Elizabeth's parliaments lasted for eleven years, though, it is true, it held only three sessions. Parliament was no longer a meeting dissolved as soon as some specific business was finished. It tended to become a permanent power in the State, and a power with formidable attributes. A monarch that swayed and did not fear parliament could afford to recognize its sovereignty, for it was his own. And never were the authority and sovereignty of parliament more emphatically asserted than in Tudor times. Sir Thomas Smith was secretary to Queen Elizabeth, and in a book which was published in 1589, and which he called The Commonwealth of England and the manner o f government thereof, he declares that " the most high and absolute power of the realm of England eonsisteth in the parliament." Such doctrines could be preached with safety while Tudor kingcraft remained; when it departed they shook and upset the throne.
It was in Tudor times that both houses began to keep their journals and that the house of commons acquired a permanent home of their own. But these are matters of which more will be said hereafter. Owing to the existence of the journals we now begin

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE effect to her wishes. Before Henry VIII what is life of parliament was usually comprised within a single session, and what is sessions were short. Parliaments now grew longer. Henry VIII's Reformation parliament lasted for seven years. One of Elizabeth's parliaments lasted for eleven years, though, it is true, it held only three sessions. Parliament was no longer a meeting dissolved as soon as some specific business was finished. It tended to become a permanent power in what is State, and a power with formidable attributes. A monarch that swayed and did not fear parliament could afford to recognize its sovereignty, for it was his own. And never were what is authority and sovereignty of parliament more emphatically asserted than in Tudor times. Sir Thomas Smith was secretary to Queen Elizabeth, and in a book which was published in 1589, and which he called what is Commonwealth of England and what is manner o f government thereof, he declares that " what is most high and absolute power of what is realm of England eonsisteth in what is parliament." Such doctrines could be preached with safety while Tudor kingcraft remained; when it departed they shook and upset what is throne. It was in Tudor times that both houses began to keep their journals and that what is house of commons acquired a permanent home of their own. But these are matters of which more will be said hereafter. Owing to what is existence of what is journals we now begin where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 026 where is p align="center" where is strong ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT where is p align="justify" effect to her wishes. Before Henry VIII what is life of parliament was usually comprised within a single session, and what is sessions were short. Parliaments now grew longer. Henry VIII's Reformation parliament lasted for seven years. One of Elizabeth's parliaments lasted for eleven years, though, it is true, it held only three sessions. Parliament was no longer a meeting dissolved as soon as some specific business was finished. It tended to become a permanent power in what is State, and a power with formidable attributes. A monarch that swayed and did not fear parliament could afford to recognize its sovereignty, for it was his own. And never were what is authority and sovereignty of parliament more emphatically asserted than in Tudor times. Sir Thomas Smith was secretary to Queen Elizabeth, and in a book which was published in 1589, and which he called what is Commonwealth of England and what is manner o f government thereof, he declares that " what is most high and absolute power of the realm of England eonsisteth in what is parliament." Such doctrines could be preached with safety while Tudor kingcraft remained; when it departed they shook and upset what is throne. It was in Tudor times that both houses began to keep their journals and that what is house of commons acquired a permanent home of their own. But these are matters of which more will be said hereafter. Owing to what is existence of what is journals we now begin where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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