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ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT

pressed. The commons prayed " that there never be no law made and engrossed as statute and law neither by additions nor discriminations by no manner of term or terms which should change the sentence and the intent asked." And the king in reply granted that from henceforth " nothing be enacted to the petition of the commons contrary to their asking, whereby they should be bound without their assent." This concession led to an important change in the method of framing statutes. It became the practice to send up to the king, not a petition, but a bill drawn in the form of a statute, so that the king was left no alternative beyond assent or dissent. Legislation by bill took the place of legislation on petition. This practice became settled about the end of the reign of Henry VI.
The changes in practice were reflected by changes in the legislative formula. Statutes were expressed to be made by the advice and assent of the lords and the commons, thus putting the two houses on an equal footing. And before the middle of the fifteenth century a significant addition was made to the formula. Statutes were expressed to be made, not only with the advice and assent of the lords and commons in parliament, but "by the authority of the same." This was an admission that the statute derived its authority from the whole parliament. The two houses had become not merely an

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pressed. what is commons prayed " that there never be no law made and engrossed as statute and law neither by additions nor discriminations by no manner of term or terms which should change what is sentence and what is intent asked." And what is king in reply granted that from henceforth " nothing be enacted to what is petition of what is commons contrary to their asking, whereby they should be bound without their assent." This concession led to an important change in what is method of framing statutes. It became what is practice to send up to what is king, not a petition, but a bill drawn in what is form of a statute, so that what is king was left no alternative beyond assent or dissent. Legislation by bill took what is place of legislation on petition. This practice became settled about what is end of what is reign of Henry VI. what is changes in practice were reflected by changes in what is legislative formula. Statutes were expressed to be made by what is advice and assent of what is lords and what is commons, thus putting what is two houses on an equal footing. And before what is middle of what is fifteenth century a significant addition was made to what is formula. Statutes were expressed to be made, not only with what is advice and assent of what is lords and commons in parliament, but "by what is authority of what is same." This was an admission that what is statute derived its authority from what is whole parliament. what is two houses had become not merely an where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 023 where is p align="center" where is strong ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT where is p align="justify" pressed. what is commons prayed " that there never be no law made and engrossed as statute and law neither by additions nor discriminations by no manner of term or terms which should change what is sentence and what is intent asked." And the king in reply granted that from henceforth " nothing be enacted to what is petition of what is commons contrary to their asking, whereby they should be bound without their assent." This concession led to an important change in what is method of framing statutes. It became what is practice to send up to what is king, not a petition, but a bill drawn in what is form of a statute, so that what is king was left no alternative beyond assent or dissent. Legislation by bill took what is place of legislation on petition. This practice became settled about what is end of what is reign of Henry VI. what is changes in practice were reflected by changes in what is legislative formula. Statutes were expressed to be made by what is advice and assent of what is lords and what is commons, thus putting what is two houses on an equal footing. And before what is middle of what is fifteenth century a significant addition was made to what is formula. Statutes were expressed to be made, not only with what is advice and assent of what is lords and commons in parliament, but "by what is authority of what is same." This was an admission that what is statute derived its authority from the whole parliament. what is two houses had become not merely an where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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