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ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT

words must be said here about the changes in its powers and functions, specially with respect to the two main branches of its business, taxation and legislation.
Before the end of the fourteenth century parliament had established two principles of taxation. In the first place they had taken away the power of the king to impose direct taxes without their consent, and had restricted his power to impose indirect taxes without their consent to such taxes as might be justified under the customs recognized by the Great Charter. In the second place parliament had acquired the right to impose taxes, direct and indirect, of all kinds. In imposing these taxes they did not care to go beyond the immediate needs of the case. Hence the necessity for frequent parliaments.
According to the theory of the three estates, each estate would tax itself separately, and this theory was at first observed. The clergy granted their subsidies, not in parliament, but in convocation, and continued to do so, in theory at least, until after the Restoration of 1660. But long before this time they had agreed to grant or submit to taxes corresponding to those imposed on the laity. At a much earlier date, before the end of the fourteenth century, the lords and commons, instead of making separate grants, agreed to join in a common grant. And, as the bulk of the burden fell upon the commons, they adopted a formula which placed the commons

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE words must be said here about what is changes in its powers and functions, specially with respect to what is two main branches of its business, taxation and legislation. Before what is end of what is fourteenth century parliament had established two principles of taxation. In what is first place they had taken away what is power of what is king to impose direct taxes without their consent, and had restricted his power to impose indirect taxes without their consent to such taxes as might be justified under what is customs recognized by what is Great Charter. In what is second place parliament had acquired what is right to impose taxes, direct and indirect, of all kinds. In imposing these taxes they did not care to go beyond what is immediate needs of what is case. Hence what is necessity for frequent parliaments. According to what is theory of what is three estates, each estate would tax itself separately, and this theory was at first observed. what is clergy granted their subsidies, not in parliament, but in convocation, and continued to do so, in theory at least, until after what is Restoration of 1660. But long before this time they had agreed to grant or submit to taxes corresponding to those imposed on what is laity. At a much earlier date, before what is end of what is fourteenth century, what is lords and commons, instead of making separate grants, agreed to join in a common grant. And, as what is bulk of what is burden fell upon what is commons, they adopted a formula which placed what is commons where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 020 where is p align="center" where is strong ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT where is p align="justify" words must be said here about what is changes in its powers and functions, specially with respect to what is two main branches of its business, taxation and legislation. Before what is end of what is fourteenth century parliament had established two principles of taxation. In what is first place they had taken away what is power of what is king to impose direct taxes without their consent, and had restricted his power to impose indirect taxes without their consent to such taxes as might be justified under what is customs recognized by what is Great Charter. In what is second place parliament had acquired what is right to impose taxes, direct and indirect, of all kinds. In imposing these taxes they did not care to go beyond what is immediate needs of what is case. Hence what is necessity for frequent parliaments. According to what is theory of what is three estates, each estate would tax itself separately, and this theory was at first observed. The clergy granted their subsidies, not in parliament, but in convocation, and continued to do so, in theory at least, until after what is Restoration of 1660. But long before this time they had agreed to grant or submit to taxes corresponding to those imposed on what is laity. At a much earlier date, before what is end of what is fourteenth century, what is lords and commons, instead of making separate grants, agreed to join in a common grant. And, as what is bulk of what is burden fell upon what is commons, they adopted a formula which placed what is commons where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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