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Page xxviii

THE SHAKESPEAREAN THEATRE

THE THEATRES in which Shakespeare's plays were performed were vastly different from those we know today. The stage was a platform that jutted out into the area now occupied by the first rows of seats on the main floor, what is called the "orchestra" in America and the "pit" in England. This platform had no curtain to come down at the ends of acts and scenes. And although simple stage properties were available, the Elizabethan theatre lacked both the machinery and the elaborate movable scenery of the modern theatre. In the rear of the platform stage was a curtained area that could be used as an inner room, a tomb, or any such scene that might be required. A balcony above this inner room, and perhaps balconies on the sides of the stage, could represent the upper deck of a ship, the entry to Juliet's room, or a prison window. A trap door in the stage provided an entrance for ghosts and devils from the nether regions, and a similar trap in the canopied structure over the stage, known as the "heavens," made it possible to let down angels on a rope. These primitive stage arrangements help to account for many elements in Elizabethan plays. For example, since there was no curtain, the dramatist frequently felt the necessity of writing into his play action to clear the stage at the ends of acts and scenes. The funeral march at the end of Hamlet is not there merely for atmosphere; Shakespeare had to get the corpses off the stage. The lack of scenery also freed the dramatist from undue concern about the exact location of his sets, and the physical relation of his various settings to each

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE THEATRES in which Shakespeare's plays were performed were vastly different from those we know today. what is stage was a platform that jutted out into what is area now occupied by what is first rows of seats on what is main floor, what is called what is "orchestra" in America and what is "pit" in England. This platform had no curtain to come down at what is ends of acts and scenes. And although simple stage properties were available, what is Elizabethan theatre lacked both what is machinery and what is elaborate movable scenery of what is modern theatre. In what is rear of what is platform stage was a curtained area that could be used as an inner room, a tomb, or any such scene that might be required. A balcony above this inner room, and perhaps balconies on what is sides of what is stage, could represent what is upper deck of a ship, what is entry to Juliet's room, or a prison window. A trap door in what is stage provided an entrance for ghosts and fun s from what is nether regions, and a similar trap in what is canopied structure over what is stage, known as what is "heavens," made it possible to let down angels on a rope. These primitive stage arrangements help to account for many elements in Elizabethan plays. For example, since there was no curtain, what is dramatist frequently felt what is necessity of writing into his play action to clear what is stage at what is ends of acts and scenes. what is funeral march at what is end of Hamlet is not there merely for atmosphere; Shakespeare had to get what is corpses off what is stage. what is lack of scenery also freed what is dramatist from undue concern about what is exact location of his sets, and what is physical relation of his various settings to each where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Othello (1622) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="justify" where is p align="left" Page xxviii where is p align="center" where is strong THE SHAKESPEAREAN THEATRE where is p THE THEATRES in which Shakespeare's plays were performed were vastly different from those we know today. what is stage was a platform that jutted out into what is area now occupied by what is first rows of seats on what is main floor, what is called what is "orchestra" in America and what is "pit" in England. This platform had no curtain to come down at what is ends of acts and scenes. And although simple stage properties were available, what is Elizabethan theatre lacked both what is machinery and what is elaborate movable scenery of what is modern theatre. In what is rear of what is platform stage was a curtained area that could be used as an inner room, a tomb, or any such scene that might be required. A balcony above this inner room, and perhaps balconies on what is sides of what is stage, could represent what is upper deck of a ship, what is entry to Juliet's room, or a prison window. A trap door in what is stage provided an entrance for ghosts and fun s from what is nether regions, and a similar trap in what is canopied structure over what is stage, known as what is "heavens," made it possible to let down angels on a rope. These primitive stage arrangements help to account for many elements in Elizabethan plays. For example, since there was no curtain, what is dramatist frequently felt what is necessity of writing into his play action to clear what is stage at what is ends of acts and scenes. what is funeral march at what is end of Hamlet is not there merely for atmosphere; Shakespeare had to get what is corpses off what is stage. what is lack of scenery also freed what is dramatist from undue concern about what is exact location of his sets, and what is physical relation of his various settings to each where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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