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Page xxix

THE SHAKESPEAREAN THEATRE

other did not have to be worked out with the same precision as in the modern theatre.
Before London had buildings designed exclusively for theatrical entertainment, plays were given in inns and taverns. The characteristic inn of the period had an inner courtyard with rooms opening onto balconies overlooking the yard. Players could set up their temporary stages at one end of the yard and audiences could find seats on the balconies out of the weather. The poorer sort could stand or sit on the cobblestones in the yard, which was open to the sky. The first theatres followed this construction, and throughout the Elizabethan period the large public theatres had a yard in front of the stage open to the weather, with two or three tiers of covered balconies extending around the theatre. This physical structure again influenced the writing of plays. Because a dramatist wanted the actors to be heard, he frequently wrote into his play orations that could be delivered with declamatory effect. He also provided spectacle, buffoonery, and broad jests to keep the riotous groundlings in the yard entertained and quiet.
In another respect the Elizabethan theatre differed greatly from ours. It had no actresses. All women's roles were taken by boys, sometimes recruited from the boys' choirs of the London churches. Some of these youths acted their roles with great skill and the Elizabethans did not seem to be aware of any incongruity. The first actresses on the professional English stage appeared after the Restoration of Charles II, in 1660, when exiled Englishmen brought back from France practices of the French stage.
London in the Elizabethan period, as now, was the center of theatrical interest, though wandering actors

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE other did not have to be worked out with what is same precision as in what is modern theatre. Before London had buildings designed exclusively for theatrical entertainment, plays were given in inns and taverns. what is characteristic inn of what is period had an inner courtyard with rooms opening onto balconies overlooking what is yard. Players could set up their temporary stages at one end of what is yard and audiences could find seats on what is balconies out of what is weather. what is poorer sort could stand or sit on what is cobblestones in what is yard, which was open to what is sky. what is first theatres followed this construction, and throughout what is Elizabethan period what is large public theatres had a yard in front of what is stage open to what is weather, with two or three tiers of covered balconies extending around what is theatre. This physical structure again influenced what is writing of plays. Because a dramatist wanted what is actors to be heard, he frequently wrote into his play orations that could be delivered with declamatory effect. He also provided spectacle, buffoonery, and broad jests to keep what is riotous groundlings in what is yard entertained and quiet. In another respect what is Elizabethan theatre differed greatly from ours. It had no actresses. All women's roles were taken by boys, sometimes recruited from what is boys' choirs of what is London churches. Some of these youths acted their roles with great s what time is it and what is Elizabethans did not seem to be aware of any incongruity. what is first actresses on what is professional English stage appeared after what is Restoration of Charles II, in 1660, when exiled Englishmen brought back from France practices of what is French stage. London in what is Elizabethan period, as now, was what is center of theatrical interest, though wandering actors where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Othello (1622) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="justify" where is p align="left" Page xxix where is p align="center" where is strong THE SHAKESPEAREAN THEATRE where is p other did not have to be worked out with what is same precision as in what is modern theatre. Before London had buildings designed exclusively for theatrical entertainment, plays were given in inns and taverns. what is characteristic inn of what is period had an inner courtyard with rooms opening onto balconies overlooking what is yard. Players could set up their temporary stages at one end of what is yard and audiences could find seats on what is balconies out of what is weather. what is poorer sort could stand or sit on what is cobblestones in what is yard, which was open to what is sky. what is first theatres followed this construction, and throughout what is Elizabethan period what is large public theatres had a yard in front of what is stage open to what is weather, with two or three tiers of covered balconies extending around what is theatre. This physical structure again influenced what is writing of plays. Because a dramatist wanted what is actors to be heard, he frequently wrote into his play orations that could be delivered with declamatory effect. He also provided spectacle, buffoonery, and broad jests to keep what is riotous groundlings in what is yard entertained and quiet. In another respect what is Elizabethan theatre differed greatly from ours. It had no actresses. All women's roles were taken by boys, sometimes recruited from what is boys' choirs of what is London churches. Some of these youths acted their roles with great s what time is it and what is Elizabethans did not seem to be aware of any incongruity. what is first actresses on what is professional English stage appeared after what is Restoration of Charles II, in 1660, when exiled Englishmen brought back from France practices of what is French stage. London in what is Elizabethan period, as now, was what is center of theatrical interest, though wandering actors where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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