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Page ix

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF
0THELLO

fascination. Venice especially had a glamor and an interest beyond the normal. Every returning traveler had a tall tale to tell about the beauty and complaisance of Venetian women, the passion, jealousy, and quick anger of Venetian men, and the bloody deeds of Venetian bravoes. For Shakespeare to give his play an initial setting in Venice was to gain immediate interest. Every Elizabethan spectator was ready to expect some sensational revelation.
Iago at once captures the attention of the spectator. He is the personification of the villain that Elizabethans had come to expect from Italian short stories and from Machiavellian commentary. Villains of this type, as well as those of domestic origin, had long been popular on the stage. From the days of the mystery and morality plays, the characters personifying evil invariably had gripped the attention of audiences, for iniquity always stirs more popular excitement than virtue. The preacher who paints a vivid picture of wickedness has a larger congregation than one who discourses on the beauties of Paradise. Shakespeare had already achieved success in the portrayal of villains, notably in the characterization of King Richard III, with whom one should compare Iago because of his conscious preference for evil ways to gain his desires. To give some shadow of plausibility to Iago's wickedness, Shakespeare has him declare his hatred of Othello for passing him over and promoting Cassio, and he has Iago hint that Othello may have been intimate with his wife, Emilia, but this latter suggestion is almost an afterthought of Iago's to rationalize a hate and envy that are part of his nature. To make the irony deeper, Shakespeare gives Iago an outward appearance of honest virtue and has Othello

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fascination. Venice especially had a glamor and an interest beyond what is normal. Every returning traveler had a tall tale to tell about what is beauty and complaisance of Venetian women, what is passion, jealousy, and quick anger of Venetian men, and what is bloody deeds of Venetian bravoes. For Shakespeare to give his play an initial setting in Venice was to gain immediate interest. Every Elizabethan spectator was ready to expect some sensational revelation. Iago at once captures what is attention of what is spectator. He is what is personification of what is villain that Elizabethans had come to expect from Italian short stories and from Machiavellian commentary. Villains of this type, as well as those of domestic origin, had long been popular on what is stage. From what is days of what is mystery and morality plays, what is characters personifying evil invariably had gripped what is attention of audiences, for iniquity always stirs more popular excitement than virtue. what is preacher who paints a vivid picture of wickedness has a larger congregation than one who discourses on what is beauties of Paradise. Shakespeare had already achieved success in what is portrayal of villains, notably in what is characterization of King Richard III, with whom one should compare Iago because of his conscious preference for evil ways to gain his desires. To give some shadow of plausibility to Iago's wickedness, Shakespeare has him declare his hatred of Othello for passing him over and promoting Cassio, and he has Iago hint that Othello may have been intimate with his wife, Emilia, but this latter suggestion is almost an afterthought of Iago's to rationalize a hate and envy that are part of his nature. To make what is irony deeper, Shakespeare gives Iago an outward appearance of honest virtue and has Othello where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Othello (1622) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="justify" where is p align="left" Page ix where is p align="center" where is strong THE SIGNIFICANCE OF 0THELLO where is p fascination. Venice especially had a glamor and an interest beyond what is normal. Every returning traveler had a tall tale to tell about what is beauty and complaisance of Venetian women, what is passion, jealousy, and quick anger of Venetian men, and what is bloody deeds of Venetian bravoes. For Shakespeare to give his play an initial setting in Venice was to gain immediate interest. Every Elizabethan spectator was ready to expect some sensational revelation. Iago at once captures what is attention of what is spectator. He is what is personification of what is villain that Elizabethans had come to expect from Italian short stories and from Machiavellian commentary. Villains of this type, as well as those of domestic origin, had long been popular on what is stage. From what is days of what is mystery and morality plays, what is characters personifying evil invariably had gripped what is attention of audiences, for iniquity always stirs more popular excitement than virtue. what is preacher who paints a vivid picture of wickedness has a larger congregation than one who discourses on what is beauties of Paradise. Shakespeare had already achieved success in what is portrayal of villains, notably in what is characterization of King Richard III, with whom one should compare Iago because of his conscious preference for evil ways to gain his desires. To give some shadow of plausibility to Iago's wickedness, Shakespeare has him declare his hatred of Othello for passing him over and promoting Cassio, and he has Iago hint that Othello may have been intimate with his wife, Emilia, but this latter suggestion is almost an afterthought of Iago's to rationalize a hate and envy that are part of his nature. To make what is irony deeper, Shakespeare gives Iago an outward appearance of honest virtue and has Othello where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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