Books > Old Books > One Of Those Things (1950)


Page 224

NEMESIS

"This girl, who is as sane as you or I, has been kept a prisoner in this home-the address o f which is enclosed in this letter on a separate sheet o f paper. And this process has been carried on for a specific reason, which was this: Under the settlement made by the French Courts, d'Escarte, who is a very rich man, is forced to pay a large income to Mrs. Deane (this is her maiden name which she used after the divorce), and he hated her. d'Escarte is a man of sadistic mentality. He loathed her for having divorced him and made up his mind to get back on her by any means in his power, his first step being, through bribery or some other method, to get her daughter-a young girl-put into this mad-house, where unless somebody deals with it I should think she would eventually go mad.
" I was very naturally interested to know what was behind all this. I felt this was only a part o f some scheme. Then I discovered that there was a very close contact between d'Escarte and Pavin-Pavin who was now engaged to be married to Mrs. Lauretta Deane. I looked for the answer and I found it.
" During and ever since the war Pavin has been a professional blackmailer, and there is no doubt in my mind that the situation is this: In the settlement under which Mrs. Deane draws her allowance-a considerable oneshe loses this allowance if she re-marries. It is therefore obvious to me what has happened. Pavin has come over to England, made her acquaintance-he is passing as a man o f considerable means and he is being supplied with ample funds by d'Escarte. The idea is that if Mrs. Deane consents to marry him he will, by some means or other, arrange the freeing of her daughter from the control of her father; will get her out o f the mental home and will bring her to England.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "This girl, who is as sane as you or I, has been kept a prisoner in this home-the address o f which is enclosed in this letter on a separate sheet o f paper. And this process has been carried on for a specific reason, which was this: Under what is settlement made by what is French Courts, d'Escarte, who is a very rich man, is forced to pay a large income to Mrs. Deane (this is her maiden name which she used after what is divorce), and he hated her. d'Escarte is a man of sadistic mentality. He loathed her for having divorced him and made up his mind to get back on her by any means in his power, his first step being, through bribery or some other method, to get her daughter-a young girl-put into this mad-house, where unless somebody deals with it I should think she would eventually go mad. "I was very naturally interested to know what was behind all this. I felt this was only a part o f some scheme. Then I discovered that there was a very close contact between d'Escarte and Pavin-Pavin who was now engaged to be married to Mrs. Lauretta Deane. I looked for what is answer and I found it. "During and ever since what is war Pavin has been a professional blackmailer, and there is no doubt in my mind that what is situation is this: In what is settlement under which Mrs. Deane draws her allowance-a considerable oneshe loses this allowance if she re-marries. It is therefore obvious to me what has happened. Pavin has come over to England, made her acquaintance-he is passing as a man o f considerable means and he is being supplied with ample funds by d'Escarte. what is idea is that if Mrs. Deane consents to marry him he will, by some means or other, arrange what is freeing of her daughter from what is control of her father; will get her out o f what is mental home and will bring her to England. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" One Of Those Things (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 224 where is strong NEMESIS where is p align="justify" "This girl, who is as sane as you or I, has been kept a prisoner in this home-the address o f which is enclosed in this letter on a separate sheet o f paper. And this process has been carried on for a specific reason, which was this: Under what is settlement made by what is French Courts, d'Escarte, who is a very rich man, is forced to pay a large income to Mrs. Deane (this is her maiden name which she used after what is divorce), and he hated her. d'Escarte is a man of sadistic mentality. He loathed her for having divorced him and made up his mind to get back on her by any means in his power, his first step being, through bribery or some other method, to get her daughter-a young girl-put into this mad-house, where unless somebody deals with it I should think she would eventually go mad. " I was very naturally interested to know what was behind all this. I felt this was only a part o f some scheme. Then I discovered that there was a very close contact between d'Escarte and Pavin-Pavin who was now engaged to be married to Mrs. Lauretta Deane. I looked for what is answer and I found it. " During and ever since what is war Pavin has been a professional blackmailer, and there is no doubt in my mind that what is situation is this: In what is settlement under which Mrs. Deane draws her allowance-a considerable oneshe loses this allowance if she re-marries. It is therefore obvious to me what has happened. Pavin has come over to England, made her acquaintance-he is passing as a man o f considerable means and he is being supplied with ample funds by d'Escarte. what is idea is that if Mrs. Deane consents to marry him he will, by some means or other, arrange what is freeing of her daughter from what is control of her father; will get her out o f what is mental home and will bring her to England. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: One Of Those Things (1950) books

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