Books > Old Books > One Of Those Things (1950)


Page 223

NEMESIS

was engaged to another man; that they were to be married shortly. This man's name was George Edward Pavin. And when I heard it it rang a bell in my mind. I remembered the name vaguely and I also remembered that there were some implications about it which weren't very nice. But I said nothing. I stayed for a meal and returned to London after a promise that I would go down there again.
" I came back to London; got into touch with our people in the States on the telephone and received information from them which confirmed my suspicions. George Edward
Pavin, apparently a good-looking, well-educated English,
man, was not even English. He was a Frenchman who spoke English perfectly and a couple of other languages, and during the war he was a known collaborator with the Germans. He worked for them against the allies. How he got away with it I don't know. Apparently there was not sufficient evidence against him-he'd been too clever-to bring him to trial at the end o f the war.
" Then I flew over to France and began a systematic research into George Edward Pavin and I discovered something which appalled me.
" Pavin was a close associate o f a very rich and, on the surface, not unattractive South American-one Alphonse d'Escarte. The interesting thing was that this Alphonse d'Escarte was Mrs. Lauretta Deane's husband whom she divorced in Paris some two years before the war. d'Escarte was, for financial reasons, given the custody o f his wife's daughter after the divorce proceedings. It was thought better for her because her health was not good, that she should live in France, but within a year her health was so bad that Mrs. Deane was informed that her daughter had become an inmate o f a mental home. Everything seemed to be in order, but it wasn't.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was engaged to another man; that they were to be married shortly. This man's name was George Edward Pavin. And when I heard it it rang a bell in my mind. I remembered what is name vaguely and I also remembered that there were some implications about it which weren't very nice. But I said nothing. I stayed for a meal and returned to London after a promise that I would go down there again. "I came back to London; got into touch with our people in what is States on what is telephone and received information from them which confirmed my suspicions. George Edward Pavin, apparently a good-looking, well-educated English, man, was not even English. He was a Frenchman who spoke English perfectly and a couple of other languages, and during what is war he was a known collaborator with what is Germans. He worked for them against what is allies. How he got away with it I don't know. Apparently there was not sufficient evidence against him-he'd been too clever-to bring him to trial at what is end o f what is war. "Then I flew over to France and began a systematic research into George Edward Pavin and I discovered something which appalled me. "Pavin was a close associate o f a very rich and, on what is surface, not unattractive South American-one Alphonse d'Escarte. what is interesting thing was that this Alphonse d'Escarte was Mrs. Lauretta Deane's husband whom she divorced in Paris some two years before what is war. d'Escarte was, for financial reasons, given what is custody o f his wife's daughter after what is divorce proceedings. It was thought better for her because her health was not good, that she should live in France, but within a year her health was so bad that Mrs. Deane was informed that her daughter had become an inmate o f a mental home. Everything seemed to be in order, but it wasn't. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" One Of Those Things (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 223 where is strong NEMESIS where is p align="justify" was engaged to another man; that they were to be married shortly. This man's name was George Edward Pavin. And when I heard it it rang a bell in my mind. I remembered what is name vaguely and I also remembered that there were some implications about it which weren't very nice. But I said nothing. I stayed for a meal and returned to London after a promise that I would go down there again. " I came back to London; got into touch with our people in what is States on what is telephone and received information from them which confirmed my suspicions. George Edward Pavin, apparently a good-looking, well-educated English, man, was not even English. He was a Frenchman who spoke English perfectly and a couple of other languages, and during what is war he was a known collaborator with what is Germans. He worked for them against what is allies. How he got away with it I don't know. Apparently there was not sufficient evidence against him-he'd been too clever-to bring him to trial at what is end o f what is war. " Then I flew over to France and began a systematic research into George Edward Pavin and I discovered something which appalled me. " Pavin was a close associate o f a very rich and, on what is surface, not unattractive South American-one Alphonse d'Escarte. what is interesting thing was that this Alphonse d'Escarte was Mrs. Lauretta Deane's husband whom she divorced in Paris some two years before what is war. d'Escarte was, for financial reasons, given what is custody o f his wife's daughter after what is divorce proceedings. It was thought better for her because her health was not good, that she should live in France, but within a year her health was so bad that Mrs. Deane was informed that her daughter had become an inmate o f a mental home. Everything seemed to be in order, but it wasn't. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: One Of Those Things (1950) books

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