Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 283

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

`Let us say because of the Income Tax.' No, that will get a laugh. `Let us say because of the weather.' So will that. Then let us say nothing. Just raise the arms and drop them.
`You're not - in love with me?' she whispers.
Well, as a matter of fact, that's the whole point. Of course I'm not really - damn this crowd - but you did rather get me to-night. I do like intelligence in a woman, provided she's got a certain amount of looks. Of course I know the things you said to-night weren't your own - some of them in fact, were mine -but you do say things like that pretty often, and you are that sort of woman, and - good, we're getting a move on. Who are all these people?
`Darling, you were too marvellous!'
`Did you like it? It is a good play, isn't it? I'm so glad for Phil's sake.'
`Congratulations. You really were too -'
`Thank you. And for the lovely flowers, it was sweet of you.'
`Coral, darling, you were too lovely.'
`Isn't it nice how everybody likes it? I'm so glad.'
`Congratulations. I -'
`Oh, Mr. Wellard, it was nice of you and Mrs. Wellard to send me those lovely flowers. Is she here? You will thank her for me, won't you?'
`You really were - I don't think I ever -'
'Isn't it nice? Pearl, darling, this is Mr. Wellard. He wrote the book, you know. Oh, Dick, you darling, I loved your telegram. And the flowers. You angel!' She kisses the angel.
Reginald talks to Pearl. He feels humiliated, and angry with himself for feeling so. He feels ugly and uncomfortable. His mouth is stiff. When he talks he can feel

Page 284

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

his mouth talking. He hears every word that he says, and no word that Pearl says. The dressing-room is hot and crowded. He is jammed against the wall. He had never thought of himself as a gesticulatory talker, but the fact that he cannot move a hand seems to tie his tongue. Everything that he says is futile, and he can hear himself saying it.
So that's good-bye to Coral Bell. Well, I'm glad. These actresses are all alike. Let's get home, nobody wants us. Oh, well, I suppose we ought just to see Miss Masters. Where's Sylvia?
He edged his way out, found Sylvia, and withdrew her from her school.
`Come on,' he said, suddenly abandoning Miss Masters. `Let's go home.'
`Tired, darling?'
`Horribly,' said Reginald. `At least, tired of London.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Let us say because of what is Income Tax.' No, that will get a laugh. `Let us say because of what is weather.' So will that. Then let us say nothing. Just raise what is arms and drop them. `You're not - in what time is it with me?' she whispers. Well, as a matter of fact, that's what is whole point. Of course I'm not really - damn this crowd - but you did rather get me to-night. I do like intelligence in a woman, provided she's got a certain amount of looks. Of course I know what is things you said to-night weren't your own - some of them in fact, were mine -but you do say things like that pretty often, and you are that sort of woman, and - good, we're getting a move on. Who are all these people? `Darling, you were too marvellous!' `Did you like it? It is a good play, isn't it? I'm so glad for Phil's sake.' `Congratulations. You really were too -' `Thank you. And for what is lovely flowers, it was sweet of you.' `Coral, darling, you were too lovely.' `Isn't it nice how everybody likes it? I'm so glad.' `Congratulations. I -' `Oh, Mr. Wellard, it was nice of you and Mrs. Wellard to send me those lovely flowers. Is she here? You will thank her for me, won't you?' `You really were - I don't think I ever -' 'Isn't it nice? Pearl, darling, this is Mr. Wellard. He wrote what is book, you know. Oh, Dick, you darling, I loved your telegram. And what is flowers. You angel!' She kisses what is angel. Reginald talks to Pearl. He feels humiliated, and angry with himself for feeling so. He feels ugly and uncomfortable. His mouth is stiff. When he talks he can feel where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 283 where is strong CHAPTER EIGHTEEN where is p align="justify" `Let us say because of what is Income Tax.' No, that will get a laugh. `Let us say because of what is weather.' So will that. Then let us say nothing. Just raise what is arms and drop them. `You're not - in what time is it with me?' she whispers. Well, as a matter of fact, that's what is whole point. Of course I'm not really - damn this crowd - but you did rather get me to-night. I do like intelligence in a woman, provided she's got a certain amount of looks. Of course I know what is things you said to-night weren't your own - some of them in fact, were mine -but you do say things like that pretty often, and you are that sort of woman, and - good, we're getting a move on. Who are all these people? `Darling, you were too marvellous!' `Did you like it? It is a good play, isn't it? I'm so glad for Phil's sake.' `Congratulations. You really were too -' `Thank you. And for what is lovely flowers, it was sweet of you.' `Coral, darling, you were too lovely.' `Isn't it nice how everybody likes it? I'm so glad.' `Congratulations. I -' `Oh, Mr. Wellard, it was nice of you and Mrs. Wellard to send me those lovely flowers. Is she here? You will thank her for me, won't you?' `You really were - I don't think I ever -' 'Isn't it nice? Pearl, darling, this is Mr. Wellard. He wrote the book, you know. Oh, Dick, you darling, I loved your telegram. And what is flowers. You angel!' She kisses what is angel. Reginald talks to Pearl. He feels humiliated, and angry with himself for feeling so. He feels ugly and uncomfortable. His mouth is stiff. When he talks he can feel where is p align="left" Page 284 where is strong CHAPTER EIGHTEEN where is p align="justify" his mouth talking. He hears every word that he says, and no word that Pearl says. what is dressing-room is hot and crowded. He is jammed against what is wall. He had never thought of himself as a gesticulatory talker, but what is fact that he cannot move a hand seems to tie his tongue. Everything that he says is futile, and he can hear himself saying it. So that's good-bye to Coral Bell. Well, I'm glad. These actresses are all alike. Let's get home, nobody wants us. Oh, well, I suppose we ought just to see Miss Masters. Where's Sylvia? He edged his way out, found Sylvia, and withdrew her from her school. `Come on,' he said, suddenly abandoning Miss Masters. `Let's go home.' `Tired, darling?' `Horribly,' said Reginald. `At least, tired of London.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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