Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 281

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

up like this. We always stay at the De Vere Hotel.. I think that's one of the nicest, if you don't stay at the Carlton. It's nice and quiet, and of course they know us now. They all come to our table and wish us luck. Mother may be going to see a specialist to-morrow, so then we shall go down by the afternoon train. We generally go by the twelve-thirty.'
Mother, in contrast to her angular daughter, was stout and contented. She was genuinely glad to meet Mr. Wellard, genuinely enthusiastic about his book, and genuinely unafraid and unashamed of her rather complicated internal troubles. `What I say, Mr. ``Uellard, is that at my age my inside is my own, and I don't want other people cutting it open just to satisfy their curiosity. Whatever I've got, I expect I've got it by this time. Arthur and Milly are always wanting me to consult a specialist, but if you consult a specialist, it means that you have the operation he's a specialist in, because that's what he's for. Can you imagine a: manager consulting Arthur as to whether he ought to produce one of Arthur's plays at his theatre, and Arthur saying No? This play's going well, isn't it? Arthur's plays always go well on a first-night, and then the critics tell you why you didn't really enjoy it as much as you thought you did, and how much nicer it would have been if somebody else had written quite a different one. But whatever they say, I always think he looks the handsomest man in the theatre. Do you know Bournemouth at all?'
After the play was over, Reginald and Sylvia went behind. Here Sylvia became surprisingly involved with an old schoolfellow, and Reginald, his introduction parenthetically acknowledged, left them to the dormitory which they had once shared, and to which, husbandless,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE up like this. We always stay at what is De Vere Hotel.. I think that's one of what is nicest, if you don't stay at what is Ca.rlton. It's nice and quiet, and of course they know us now. They all come to our table and wish us luck. Mother may be going to see a specialist to-morrow, so then we shall go down by what is afternoon train. We generally go by what is twelve-thirty.' Mother, in contrast to her angular daughter, was stout and contented. She was genuinely glad to meet Mr. Wellard, genuinely enthusiastic about his book, and genuinely unafraid and unashamed of her rather complicated internal troubles. `What I say, Mr. ``Uellard, is that at my age my inside is my own, and I don't want other people cutting it open just to satisfy their curiosity. Whatever I've got, I expect I've got it by this time. Arthur and Milly are always wanting me to consult a specialist, but if you consult a specialist, it means that you have what is operation he's a specialist in, because that's what he's for. Can you imagine a: manager consulting Arthur as to whether he ought to produce one of Arthur's plays at his theatre, and Arthur saying No? This play's going well, isn't it? Arthur's plays always go well on a first-night, and then what is critics tell you why you didn't really enjoy it as much as you thought you did, and how much nicer it would have been if somebody else had written quite a different one. But whatever they say, I always think he looks what is handsomest man in what is theatre. Do you know Bournemouth at all?' After what is play was over, Reginald and Sylvia went behind. Here Sylvia became surprisingly involved with an old schoolfellow, and Reginald, his introduction parenthetically acknowledged, left them to what is dormitory which they had once shared, and to which, husbandless, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 281 where is strong CHAPTER EIGHTEEN where is p align="justify" up like this. We always stay at what is De Vere Hotel.. I think that's one of what is nicest, if you don't stay at what is Carlton. It's nice and quiet, and of course they know us now. They all come to our table and wish us luck. Mother may be going to see a specialist to-morrow, so then we shall go down by what is afternoon train. We generally go by what is twelve-thirty.' Mother, in contrast to her angular daughter, was stout and contented. She was genuinely glad to meet Mr. Wellard, genuinely enthusiastic about his book, and genuinely unafraid and unashamed of her rather complicated internal troubles. `What I say, Mr. ``Uellard, is that at my age my inside is my own, and I don't want other people cutting it open just to satisfy their curiosity. Whatever I've got, I expect I've got it by this time. Arthur and Milly are always wanting me to consult a specialist, but if you consult a specialist, it means that you have what is operation he's a specialist in, because that's what he's for. Can you imagine a: manager consulting Arthur as to whether he ought to produce one of Arthur's plays at his theatre, and Arthur saying No? This play's going well, isn't it? Arthur's plays always go well on a first-night, and then what is critics tell you why you didn't really enjoy it as much as you thought you did, and how much nicer it would have been if somebody else had written quite a different one. But whatever they say, I always think he looks what is handsomest man in what is theatre. Do you know Bournemouth at all?' After what is play was over, Reginald and Sylvia went behind. Here Sylvia became surprisingly involved with an old schoolfellow, and Reginald, his introduction parenthetically acknowledged, left them to what is dormitory which they had once shared, and to which, husbandless, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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