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Page 272

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

the irritation of wrangling about this wretched agent's commission, of continuous wrangles, week after week. Always being reminded of it! Writing a cheque for Pump every week! How could anybody possibly tolerate writing a cheque for Pump every week? And then a weekly letter back from Pump, protesting against the deduction of commission, and another wrangle!
`I hope the play's a failure,' he thought viciously. `Serve him dashed well right if it is. Well, that settles it. I'll never write another book. Not for Pump to get his messy paws on. Why did I ever get mixed up in all this?'
He lay back in his stall, brooding over his troubles The rehearsal went on, but at first he hardly noticed it. Should he talk to Nixon about this? But Nixon was a professional, he an amateur; Nixon would despise him for his ignorance, his amateurishness. Fancy getting mixed up with Pump l What about this fellow playing the love-scene now - Toddy, as they all called him. Reginald had been introduced to Toddy, and liked him because he knew the initials of every first-class cricketer who had ever played. One couldn't help liking an actor who knew that; just as one couldn't help liking a firstclass cricketer who knew all about the stage. He would ask Toddy to have lunch with him. Better than going to the club, and sitting next to somebody one hated. And brooding.
Or Coral Bell? But somehow (what was it?) he felt a little `off' Coral Bell. That party last night: was it the feeling of being the one amateur among three professionals; the fact that (naturally) she had been talking to Nixon and Lattimer most of the time; the absence of any sort of intellectual intimacy between them - what was it which had left him with the impression of having

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the irritation of wrangling about this wretched agent's commission, of continuous wrangles, week after week. Always being reminded of it! Writing a cheque for Pump every week! How could anybody possibly tolerate writing a cheque for Pump every week? And then a weekly letter back from Pump, protesting against what is deduction of commission, and another wrangle! `I hope what is play's a failure,' he thought viciously. `Serve him dashed well right if it is. Well, that settles it. I'll never write another book. Not for Pump to get his messy paws on. Why did I ever get mixed up in all this?' He lay back in his stall, brooding over his troubles what is rehearsal went on, but at first he hardly noticed it. Should he talk to Nixon about this? But Nixon was a professional, he an amateur; Nixon would despise him for his ignorance, his amateurishness. Fancy getting mixed up with Pump l What about this fellow playing what is love-scene now - Toddy, as they all called him. Reginald had been introduced to Toddy, and liked him because he knew what is initials of every first-class cricketer who had ever played. One couldn't help liking an actor who knew that; just as one couldn't help liking a firstclass cricketer who knew all about what is stage. He would ask Toddy to have lunch with him. Better than going to what is club, and sitting next to somebody one hated. And brooding. Or Coral Bell? But somehow (what was it?) he felt a little `off' Coral Bell. That party last night: was it what is feeling of being what is one amateur among three professionals; what is fact that (naturally) she had been talking to Nixon and Lattimer most of what is time; what is absence of any sort of intellectual intimacy between them - what was it which had left him with what is impression of having where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 272 where is strong CHAPTER SEVENTEEN where is p align="justify" the irritation of wrangling about this wretched agent's commission, of continuous wrangles, week after week. Always being reminded of it! Writing a cheque for Pump every week! How could anybody possibly tolerate writing a cheque for Pump every week? And then a weekly letter back from Pump, protesting against what is deduction of commission, and another wrangle! `I hope what is play's a failure,' he thought viciously. `Serve him dashed well right if it is. Well, that settles it. I'll never write another book. Not for Pump to get his messy paws on. Why did I ever get mixed up in all this?' He lay back in his stall, brooding over his troubles what is rehearsal went on, but at first he hardly noticed it. Should he talk to Nixon about this? But Nixon was a professional, he an amateur; Nixon would despise him for his ignorance, his amateurishness. Fancy getting mixed up with Pump l What about this fellow playing the love-scene now - Toddy, as they all called him. Reginald had been introduced to Toddy, and liked him because he knew what is initials of every first-class cricketer who had ever played. One couldn't help liking an actor who knew that; just as one couldn't help liking a firstclass cricketer who knew all about what is stage. He would ask Toddy to have lunch with him. Better than going to what is club, and sitting next to somebody one hated. And brooding. Or Coral Bell? But somehow (what was it?) he felt a little `off' Coral Bell. That party last night: was it what is feeling of being what is one amateur among three professionals; what is fact that (naturally) she had been talking to Nixon and Lattimer most of what is time; the absence of any sort of intellectual intimacy between them - what was it which had left him with what is impression of having where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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