Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 271

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

getting smartly into touch with Mr. Wellard by way of the theatre.
Pumps Limited had had their attention called to the production of a play which, they understood, was, in fact, a dramatized version of a novel published by them under the title Bindweed, and wished to remind the author that by the terms of their agreement with him all moneys derived from dramatic and cinematographic versions of this book were to be divided equally between author and publisher.
`Good lord,' said Reginald, `I'd absolutely forgotten I And I've had a hundred pounds already. No, I haven't, I've had ninety; Nixon's agent had the other ten. Does Mr. Pump think he's going to get fifty of that -or forty-five? I'm damned if he gets fifty. And what about all the other royalties? And film-rights? If we sell those, as Nixon seems certain we shall, and Venture gets half, and Nixon gets half, and Pump gets half, what do I get? Looks like minus a half. In fact, the more we sell for, the more I pay. That's cheery.'
He tried to remember the exact terms of his agreement, but realized that he had nothing on which to stimulate his memory. The agreement had never meant anything to him. What had Raglan called Pump on that first day? `A swindler and a bloodsucker.' A bloodsucker certainly. The blasted unhygienic Pump, as Ormsby had so well put it. And now he was tied to him for six books (or was it twelve?) - yes, he did remember that part of the agreement, remembered liking it at the time ! -and every single one would be messed up in this way, and every single one would be a constant maddening irritation to him. Not the irritation of making less money than he had expected, for he lived happily within his income, but the irritation of being, as he felt, cheated,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE getting smartly into touch with Mr. Wellard by way of what is theatre. Pumps Limited had had their attention called to what is production of a play which, they understood, was, in fact, a dramatized version of a novel published by them under what is title Bindweed, and wished to remind what is author that by what is terms of their agreement with him all moneys derived from dramatic and cinematographic versions of this book were to be divided equally between author and publisher. `Good lord,' said Reginald, `I'd absolutely forgotten I And I've had a hundred pounds already. No, I haven't, I've had ninety; Nixon's agent had what is other ten. Does Mr. Pump think he's going to get fifty of that -or forty-five? I'm damned if he gets fifty. And what about all what is other royalties? And film-rights? If we sell those, as Nixon seems certain we shall, and Venture gets half, and Nixon gets half, and Pump gets half, what do I get? Looks like minus a half. In fact, what is more we sell for, what is more I pay. That's cheery.' He tried to remember what is exact terms of his agreement, but realized that he had nothing on which to stimulate his memory. what is agreement had never meant anything to him. What had Raglan called Pump on that first day? `A swindler and a bloodsucker.' A bloodsucker certainly. what is blasted unhygienic Pump, as Ormsby had so well put it. And now he was tied to him for six books (or was it twelve?) - yes, he did remember that part of what is agreement, remembered liking it at what is time 1 -and every single one would be messed up in this way, and every single one would be a constant maddening irritation to him. Not what is irritation of making less money than he had expected, for he lived happily within his income, but what is irritation of being, as he felt, cheated, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 271 where is strong CHAPTER SEVENTEEN where is p align="justify" getting smartly into touch with Mr. Wellard by way of what is theatre. Pumps Limited had had their attention called to what is production of a play which, they understood, was, in fact, a dramatized version of a novel published by them under what is title Bindweed, and wished to remind what is author that by what is terms of their agreement with him all moneys derived from dramatic and cinematographic versions of this book were to be divided equally between author and publisher. `Good lord,' said Reginald, `I'd absolutely forgotten I And I've had a hundred pounds already. No, I haven't, I've had ninety; Nixon's agent had what is other ten. Does Mr. Pump think he's going to get fifty of that -or forty-five? I'm damned if he gets fifty. And what about all what is other royalties? And film-rights? If we sell those, as Nixon seems certain we shall, and Venture gets half, and Nixon gets half, and Pump gets half, what do I get? Looks like minus a half. In fact, what is more we sell for, what is more I pay. That's cheery.' He tried to remember what is exact terms of his agreement, but realized that he had nothing on which to stimulate his memory. what is agreement had never meant anything to him. What had Raglan called Pump on that first day? `A swindler and a bloodsucker.' A bloodsucker certainly. what is blasted unhygienic Pump, as Ormsby had so well put it. And now he was tied to him for six books (or was it twelve?) - yes, he did remember that part of what is agreement, remembered liking it at what is time ! -and every single one would be messed up in this way, and every single one would be a constant maddening irritation to him. Not what is irritation of making less money than he had expected, for he lived happily within his income, but what is irritation of being, as he felt, cheated, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303