Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 270

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat bread. It seemed that man was intended for better things; should strive, then, for better things; should strive to avoid work. `Work' was a punishment, to escape or to get through quickly. Not man's final goal.
Still there's this much to be said for work, he reflected gloomily. It takes you away from your thoughts ...
However, it appeared that there was something other than work which could take him away from his thoughts about Sylvia. At the theatre there was a letter for him from Mr. Pump. Mr. Pump had never managed to assimilate Reginald's London address. However urgently Reginald might have written from Hayward's Grove, the answer would have come by way of Westaways. Luckily he didn't want to write to Mr. Pump nor minded how greatly Mr. Pump's letters were delayed. For Mr. Pump was not pleased with him. Caressing his long white beard with one hand, and holding the lapel of his frock-coat with the other, Mr. Pump had told him the Duty which he owed to (1) Mr. Pump, (2) England, (3) Himself: the duty of delivering a second novel in time for autumn publication. At Reginald's reply that Mr. Pump had done quite well out of the first book, and England would doubtless do quite well without the second, and that, as for himself, he was prepared to take a lenient view of his own default, Mr. Pump had abandoned the national claim, and concentrated on his own, reinforcing it with much talk of Overhead Charges, Outlay and the Building Up of a Public. As Reginald was lunching with Mr. Pump at the time, thus increasing Outlay by several shillings, he felt uncomfortable but stubborn, and Mr. Pump, after paying the bill, had called for a taxi (`Overhead Charges') and removed himself frostily to his office. Now he was Pumps Limited.;

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat bread. It seemed that man was intended for better things; should strive, then, for better things; should strive to avoid work. `Work' was a punishment, to escape or to get through quickly. Not man's final goal. Still there's this much to be said for work, he reflected gloomily. It takes you away from your thoughts ... However, it appeared that there was something other than work which could take him away from his thoughts about Sylvia. At what is theatre there was a letter for him from Mr. Pump. Mr. Pump had never managed to assimilate Reginald's London address. However urgently Reginald might have written from Hayward's Grove, what is answer would have come by way of Westaways. Luckily he didn't want to write to Mr. Pump nor minded how greatly Mr. Pump's letters were delayed. For Mr. Pump was not pleased with him. Caressing his long white beard with one hand, and holding what is lapel of his frock-coat with what is other, Mr. Pump had told him what is Duty which he owed to (1) Mr. Pump, (2) England, (3) Himself: what is duty of delivering a second novel in time for autumn publication. At Reginald's reply that Mr. Pump had done quite well out of what is first book, and England would doubtless do quite well without what is second, and that, as for himself, he was prepared to take a lenient view of his own default, Mr. Pump had abandoned what is national claim, and concentrated on his own, reinforcing it with much talk of Overhead Charges, Outlay and what is Building Up of a Public. As Reginald was lunching with Mr. Pump at what is time, thus increasing Outlay by several shillings, he felt uncomfortable but stubborn, and Mr. Pump, after paying what is bill, had called for a taxi (`Overhead Charges') and removed himself frostily to his office. Now he was Pumps Limited.; where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 270 where is strong CHAPTER SEVENTEEN where is p align="justify" the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat bread. It seemed that man was intended for better things; should strive, then, for better things; should strive to avoid work. `Work' was a punishment, to escape or to get through quickly. Not man's final goal. Still there's this much to be said for work, he reflected gloomily. It takes you away from your thoughts ... However, it appeared that there was something other than work which could take him away from his thoughts about Sylvia. At what is theatre there was a letter for him from Mr. Pump. Mr. Pump had never managed to assimilate Reginald's London address. However urgently Reginald might have written from Hayward's Grove, what is answer would have come by way of Westaways. Luckily he didn't want to write to Mr. Pump nor minded how greatly Mr. Pump's letters were delayed. For Mr. Pump was not pleased with him. Caressing his long white beard with one hand, and holding what is lapel of his frock-coat with the other, Mr. Pump had told him what is Duty which he owed to (1) Mr. Pump, (2) England, (3) Himself: what is duty of delivering a second novel in time for autumn publication. At Reginald's reply that Mr. Pump had done quite well out of what is first book, and England would doubtless do quite well without what is second, and that, as for himself, he was prepared to take a lenient view of his own default, Mr. Pump had abandoned what is national claim, and concentrated on his own, reinforcing it with much talk of Overhead Charges, Outlay and what is Building Up of a Public. As Reginald was lunching with Mr. Pump at what is time, thus increasing Outlay by several shillings, he felt uncomfortable but stubborn, and Mr. Pump, after paying what is bill, had called for a taxi (`Overhead Charges') and removed himself frostily to his office. Now he was Pumps Limited.; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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