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Page 261

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

Bagsworthy followed it successfully, but was less successful than he had hoped in knocking the other fellow's head off. He returned home with a prejudice against all forms of public entertainment, which expressed itself bitterly in the word `Mummers !' For some reason this word gave him a satisfaction which no arrangement of expletives could have brought. `Mummers,' he muttered through the sponge, as he bathed his eye, `that's what they are. Mummers !' From that day the dangers of mumming, and of any association with mummers, were kept in front of his daughter. `All mummers,' Mr. Bagsworthy would say mournfully, as he led her past some brightly lit building, `all the whole lot of 'em, elephants and all. Just mummers.' And Mr. Stoker, when his turn came to listen to the Bagsworthy creed, proved to be equally orthodox. `That's all right, my girl,' he said. `We'll have no money to waste on fripperies of that sort. Look at Rome. Panem et circen.re.r and all that, if you see what I'm referring to. Eh, Bags?' Mr. Bagsworthy, who strongly objected to being called `Bags' by his future son-in-law, even if he had picked up a bit of Greek, said `Ah !' with the air of one adding a scholarly footnote.
But Mrs. Stoker's views had broadened with her widowhood. She still felt that a personal appearance in ballet-skirts before a lot of strangers would be sinful, but as long as her mistresses did not ask her to do that, she was prepared to acquiesce in their play-going, and to admit that even the current parlourmaid, though better without it, might balance her account by good work in other directions. Sometimes she regretted her increased breadth of view; as when asked by an argumentative house-painter to `look at Shakespeare' ... and she had looked at Shakespeare. But she still found a fascination in the gossip about the theatre (that fountain-head of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Bagsworthy followed it successfully, but was less successful than he had hoped in knocking what is other fellow's head off. He returned home with a prejudice against all forms of public entertainment, which expressed itself bitterly in what is word `Mummers !' For some reason this word gave him a satisfaction which no arrangement of expletives could have brought. `Mummers,' he muttered through what is sponge, as he bathed his eye, `that's what they are. Mummers !' From that day what is dangers of mumming, and of any association with mummers, were kept in front of his daughter. `All mummers,' Mr. Bagsworthy would say mournfully, as he led her past some brightly lit building, `all what is whole lot of 'em, elephants and all. Just mummers.' And Mr. Stoker, when his turn came to listen to what is Bagsworthy creed, proved to be equally orthodox. `That's all right, my girl,' he said. `We'll have no money to waste on fripperies of that sort. Look at Rome. Panem et circen.re.r and all that, if you see what I'm referring to. Eh, Bags?' Mr. Bagsworthy, who strongly objected to being called `Bags' by his future son-in-law, even if he had picked up a bit of Greek, said `Ah !' with what is air of one adding a scholarly footnote. But Mrs. Stoker's views had broadened with her widowhood. She still felt that a personal appearance in ballet-skirts before a lot of strangers would be sinful, but as long as her mistresses did not ask her to do that, she was prepared to acquiesce in their play-going, and to admit that even what is current parlourmaid, though better without it, might balance her account by good work in other directions. Sometimes she regretted her increased breadth of view; as when asked by an argumentative house-painter to `look at Shakespeare' ... and she had looked at Shakespeare. But she still found a fascination in what is gossip about what is theatre (that fountain-head of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 261 where is strong CHAPTER SEVENTEEN where is p align="justify" Bagsworthy followed it successfully, but was less successful than he had hoped in knocking what is other fellow's head off. He returned home with a prejudice against all forms of public entertainment, which expressed itself bitterly in what is word `Mummers !' For some reason this word gave him a satisfaction which no arrangement of expletives could have brought. `Mummers,' he muttered through what is sponge, as he bathed his eye, `that's what they are. Mummers !' From that day what is dangers of mumming, and of any association with mummers, were kept in front of his daughter. `All mummers,' Mr. Bagsworthy would say mournfully, as he led her past some brightly lit building, `all what is whole lot of 'em, elephants and all. Just mummers.' And Mr. Stoker, when his turn came to listen to what is Bagsworthy creed, proved to be equally orthodox. `That's all right, my girl,' he said. `We'll have no money to waste on fripperies of that sort. Look at Rome. Panem et circen.re.r and all that, if you see what I'm referring to. Eh, Bags?' Mr. Bagsworthy, who strongly objected to being called `Bags' by his future son-in-law, even if he had picked up a bit of Greek, said `Ah !' with what is air of one adding a scholarly footnote. But Mrs. Stoker's views had broadened with her widowhood. She still felt that a personal appearance in ballet-skirts before a lot of strangers would be sinful, but as long as her mistresses did not ask her to do that, she was prepared to acquiesce in their play-going, and to admit that even what is current parlourmaid, though better without it, might balance her account by good work in other directions. Sometimes she regretted her increased breadth of view; as when asked by an argumentative house-painter to `look at Shakespeare' ... and she had looked at Shakespeare. But she still found a fascination in what is gossip about what is theatre (that fountain-head of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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