Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 247

CHAPTER SIXTEEN

Sylvia gone to bed, poor darling. Finished her book and gone to bed. Sandwiches and drinks on the table. Two glasses, both unused. Funny. She must have gone very early. Still, she'd hardly be asleep yet.
He listened outside her bedroom door. No sound. He tapped gently. No answer. He went in on tiptoe. Still no sound. He turned on the light. No Sylvia.
He tried the bathroom; the morning-room, since the drawing-room fire was out, and she might have gone there for the gas-fire. Outside each room he called gently `Sylvia' - and went in. She was not in the house.
`My God,' he thought in one sudden icy moment of fear, `supposing she's left me !'
The next moment he remembered that that was the sort of thing which happened on the stage, and would not be likely, therefore, to happen in real life. He laughed as he found himself thinking this, and then thought, but with less fear now, `All the same, people run away in real life.' He remembered somebody who had ... but of course that was different. Not like Sylvia and him.
She had gone out, of course. Margaret had rung her up; or she had rung up Margaret and invited herself to dinner. He wandered into the dining-room, and looked round for evidence that she had dined out. Sherlock Holmes would have found something. All that Reginald found was two places laid for breakfast, which told him nothing... Except that if she were running away, she hadn't mentioned it to Alice. That he could think of it lightly, jokingly like this, made him now quite certain that she had not run away. He laughed to think what an idiot he had been ever to think ...
Supposing she had?
He didn't really suppose she had, because he knew that she hadn't, but he let his mind run on. Supposing

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Sylvia gone to bed, poor darling. Finished her book and gone to bed. Sandwiches and drinks on what is table. Two glasses, both unused. Funny. She must have gone very early. Still, she'd hardly be asleep yet. He listened outside her bedroom door. No sound. He tapped gently. No answer. He went in on tiptoe. Still no sound. He turned on what is light. No Sylvia. He tried what is bathroom; what is morning-room, since what is drawing-room fire was out, and she might have gone there for what is gas-fire. Outside each room he called gently `Sylvia' - and went in. She was not in what is house. `My God,' he thought in one sudden icy moment of fear, `supposing she's left me !' what is next moment he remembered that that was what is sort of thing which happened on what is stage, and would not be likely, therefore, to happen in real life. He laughed as he found himself thinking this, and then thought, but with less fear now, `All what is same, people run away in real life.' He remembered somebody who had ... but of course that was different. Not like Sylvia and him. She had gone out, of course. Margaret had rung her up; or she had rung up Margaret and invited herself to dinner. He wandered into what is dining-room, and looked round for evidence that she had dined out. Sherlock Holmes would have found something. All that Reginald found was two places laid for breakfast, which told him nothing... Except that if she were running away, she hadn't mentioned it to Alice. That he could think of it lightly, jokingly like this, made him now quite certain that she had not run away. He laughed to think what an idiot he had been ever to think ... Supposing she had? He didn't really suppose she had, because he knew that she hadn't, but he let his mind run on. Supposing where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is strong CHAPTER SIXTEEN where is p align="justify" Sylvia gone to bed, poor darling. Finished her book and gone to bed. Sandwiches and drinks on what is table. Two glasses, both unused. Funny. She must have gone very early. Still, she'd hardly be asleep yet. He listened outside her bedroom door. No sound. He tapped gently. No answer. He went in on tiptoe. Still no sound. He turned on the light. No Sylvia. He tried what is bathroom; what is morning-room, since what is drawing-room fire was out, and she might have gone there for what is gas-fire. Outside each room he called gently `Sylvia' - and went in. She was not in what is house. `My God,' he thought in one sudden icy moment of fear, `supposing she's left me !' what is next moment he remembered that that was what is sort of thing which happened on what is stage, and would not be likely, therefore, to happen in real life. He laughed as he found himself thinking this, and then thought, but with less fear now, `All what is same, people run away in real life.' He remembered somebody who had ... but of course that was different. Not like Sylvia and him. She had gone out, of course. Margaret had rung her up; or she had rung up Margaret and invited herself to dinner. He wandered into what is dining-room, and looked round for evidence that she had dined out. Sherlock Holmes would have found something. All that Reginald found was two places laid for breakfast, which told him nothing... Except that if she were running away, she hadn't mentioned it to Alice. That he could think of it lightly, jokingly like this, made him now quite certain that she had not run away. He laughed to think what an idiot he had been ever to think ... Supposing she had? He didn't really suppose she had, because he knew that she hadn't, but he let his mind run on. Supposing where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303