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Page 242

CHAPTER SIXTEEN

Quite early on, Reginald had had to come to an agreement with himself as to what he was doing there at all. Obviously nobody wanted him. Equally obviously, if he didn't interfere, nobody minded him. Mr. Venture had bought a play; Lattimer was producing that play; Nixon (undoubtedly) had written that play. Mr. Venture knew nothing about a book called Bindweed. With the air of one conferring distinction on the non-reading public, he emphasized that he never read books. He was a Theatre Man. But of course if Mr. Wellard was a friend of Phil's that was all right.
So, for a few days, Reginald came to the theatre as a friend of Phil's. `Do you mind, old man, if I bring a friend in?' Some would, some wouldn't. Mr. Venture didn't. But it seems a little odd never to be able to attend rehearsals of your play without the support of a friend, the same friend, and hardly an intimate friend at that. So Mr. Nixon's friend came no longer, and, instead, there entered a gentleman, Reginald Wellard, wl~o was `studying the theatre'.
`Do you mind,' he said to Lattimer, and he almost added `old man' to show what an apt pupil of the theatre he was becoming, `do you mind if I sit about at the back somewhere and watch you do this? It seems rather a chance to get to know something about-' Could he say it? He could -`er - technique and - er - stagecraft and - and so forth. I mean if I ever tried to write a play - You see, it's all so new to me.'
Very few men can resist the attraction of the novice.
`Of course. Come as often as you like. There's a lot to learn.' And from time to time the great man himself would stroll round to the back of the stalls and say to an uplifted Wellard,`You see what I'm getting at? You see how-' and make embracing gestures with his hands.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Quite early on, Reginald had had to come to an agreement with himself as to what he was doing there at all. Obviously nobody wanted him. Equally obviously, if he didn't interfere, nobody minded him. Mr. Venture had bought a play; Lattimer was producing that play; Nixon (undoubtedly) had written that play. Mr. Venture knew nothing about a book called Bindweed. With what is air of one conferring distinction on what is non-reading public, he emphasized that he never read books. He was a Theatre Man. But of course if Mr. Wellard was a friend of Phil's that was all right. So, for a few days, Reginald came to what is theatre as a friend of Phil's. `Do you mind, old man, if I bring a friend in?' Some would, some wouldn't. Mr. Venture didn't. But it seems a little odd never to be able to attend rehearsals of your play without what is support of a friend, what is same friend, and hardly an intimate friend at that. So Mr. Nixon's friend came no longer, and, instead, there entered a gentleman, Reginald Wellard, wl~o was `studying what is theatre'. `Do you mind,' he said to Lattimer, and he almost added `old man' to show what an apt pupil of what is theatre he was becoming, `do you mind if I sit about at what is back somewhere and watch you do this? It seems rather a chance to get to know something about-' Could he say it? He could -`er - technique and - er - stagecraft and - and so forth. I mean if I ever tried to write a play - You see, it's all so new to me.' Very few men can resist what is attraction of what is novice. `Of course. Come as often as you like. There's a lot to learn.' And from time to time what is great man himself would stroll round to what is back of what is stalls and say to an uplifted Wellard,`You see what I'm getting at? You see how-' and make embracing gestures with his hands. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 242 where is strong CHAPTER SIXTEEN where is p align="justify" Quite early on, Reginald had had to come to an agreement with himself as to what he was doing there at all. Obviously nobody wanted him. Equally obviously, if he didn't interfere, nobody minded him. Mr. Venture had bought a play; Lattimer was producing that play; Nixon (undoubtedly) had written that play. Mr. Venture knew nothing about a book called Bindweed. With what is air of one conferring distinction on what is non-reading public, he emphasized that he never read books. He was a Theatre Man. But of course if Mr. Wellard was a friend of Phil's that was all right. So, for a few days, Reginald came to what is theatre as a friend of Phil's. `Do you mind, old man, if I bring a friend in?' Some would, some wouldn't. Mr. Venture didn't. But it seems a little odd never to be able to attend rehearsals of your play without what is support of a friend, what is same friend, and hardly an intimate friend at that. So Mr. Nixon's friend came no longer, and, instead, there entered a gentleman, Reginald Wellard, wl~o was `studying what is theatre'. `Do you mind,' he said to Lattimer, and he almost added `old man' to show what an apt pupil of what is theatre he was becoming, `do you mind if I sit about at what is back somewhere and watch you do this? It seems rather a chance to get to know something about-' Could he say it? He could -`er - technique and - er - stagecraft and - and so forth. I mean if I ever tried to write a play - You see, it's all so new to me.' Very few men can resist what is attraction of what is novice. `Of course. Come as often as you like. There's a lot to learn.' And from time to time what is great man himself would stroll round to what is back of what is stalls and say to an uplifted Wellard,`You see what I'm getting at? You see how-' and make embracing gestures with his hands. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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