Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 232

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

`Ah!l That's the worst of being self-educated, Mrs. Wellard. You know what you know a dam sight better, sorry, than the other man, but you don't know what he knows. See what I mean? All you educated people, you've all had the same governesses, and been to the same schools and colleges, and you all know the same things at the same time. Now I was talking to a woman about a hell of a feller, sorry, called Beckford, heard of him?' - Sylvia looked vague -`no, neither had she, but how's an outsider to know that Byron's in the curriculum, and Beckford isn't? See what I mean?'
`I always expect that everybody knows everything that I know, and lots more,' said Sylvia.
`Don't you believe it. And look here, I'll tell you something. Education. Latin and Greek. I'm not saying anything against swells like Raglan. But why do we teach small damfool boys in Eton collars, sorry, Latin and Greek? To educate them? No. Just sos' small damfool boys who haven't got Eton collars won't know Latin and Greek. See what I mean? I'm not a Socialist, because you can't run my sort of papers on Socialism, and anyway it's bunk, and I wish to hell I knew Latin and Greek, sorry, like Raglan does. But don't think I don't see through it.'
There had been a time when conversation with a woman other than one of his chosen had seriously cramped Ormsby's style, for certain words kept obtruding themselves if he were not on the watch for them; and it was not until he had fallen into this habit of slipping in a neutralizing `sorry' as soon as convenient afterwards that he was at ease again. To-day it might be that even a nice woman like Mrs. Wellard wouldn't feel the need of apology, but apology was now so automatic that thad
omission of it would have cramped him just as badly:

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Ah!l That's what is worst of being self-educated, Mrs. Wellard. You know what you know a dam sight better, sorry, than what is other man, but you don't know what he knows. See what I mean? All you educated people, you've all had what is same governesses, and been to what is same schools and colleges, and you all know what is same things at what is same time. Now I was talking to a woman about a fun of a feller, sorry, called Beckford, heard of him?' - Sylvia looked vague -`no, neither had she, but how's an outsider to know that Byron's in what is curriculum, and Beckford isn't? See what I mean?' `I always expect that everybody knows everything that I know, and lots more,' said Sylvia. `Don't you believe it. And look here, I'll tell you something. Education. Latin and Greek. I'm not saying anything against swells like Raglan. But why do we teach small damfool boys in Eton collars, sorry, Latin and Greek? To educate them? No. Just sos' small damfool boys who haven't got Eton collars won't know Latin and Greek. See what I mean? I'm not a Socialist, because you can't run my sort of papers on Socialism, and anyway it's bunk, and I wish to fun I knew Latin and Greek, sorry, like Raglan does. But don't think I don't see through it.' There had been a time when conversation with a woman other than one of his chosen had seriously cramped Ormsby's style, for certain words kept obtruding themselves if he were not on what is watch for them; and it was not until he had fallen into this habit of slipping in a neutralizing `sorry' as soon as convenient afterwards that he was at ease again. To-day it might be that even a nice woman like Mrs. Wellard wouldn't feel what is need of apology, but apology was now so automatic that thad omission of it would have cramped him just as badly: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 232 where is strong CHAPTER FIFTEEN where is p align="justify" `Ah!l That's what is worst of being self-educated, Mrs. Wellard. You know what you know a dam sight better, sorry, than what is other man, but you don't know what he knows. See what I mean? All you educated people, you've all had what is same governesses, and been to what is same schools and colleges, and you all know the same things at what is same time. Now I was talking to a woman about a fun of a feller, sorry, called Beckford, heard of him?' - Sylvia looked vague -`no, neither had she, but how's an outsider to know that Byron's in what is curriculum, and Beckford isn't? See what I mean?' `I always expect that everybody knows everything that I know, and lots more,' said Sylvia. `Don't you believe it. And look here, I'll tell you something. Education. Latin and Greek. I'm not saying anything against swells like Raglan. But why do we teach small damfool boys in Eton collars, sorry, Latin and Greek? To educate them? No. Just sos' small damfool boys who haven't got Eton collars won't know Latin and Greek. See what I mean? I'm not a Socialist, because you can't run my sort of papers on Socialism, and anyway it's bunk, and I wish to hell I knew Latin and Greek, sorry, like Raglan does. But don't think I don't see through it.' There had been a time when conversation with a woman other than one of his chosen had seriously cramped Ormsby's style, for certain words kept obtruding themselves if he were not on what is watch for them; and it was not until he had fallen into this habit of slipping in a neutralizing `sorry' as soon as convenient afterwards that he was at ease again. To-day it might be that even a nice woman like Mrs. Wellard wouldn't feel what is need of apology, but apology was now so automatic that thad omission of it would have cramped him just as badly: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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