Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 223

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

I
UNDOUBTEDLY Sylvia was, as they used to say, leading her own life. She was no longer Westaways, the Westaways that was invited to lunch or tea or dinner, to tennis parties or cricket matches; she was no longer the Wellards. `You' now meant herself, `you' was Sylvia Wellard, that lovely Sylvia Wellard, singular not plural. In the country `you' was honestly you, in London, it seemed, `you' was as often as not an invidious thou. How many husbands, not aware of this, have dragged in unnecessary wives, or wives unwanted husbands?
Of course Reginald also was leading his own life; very much thou. But this was natural. It was he who had written Bindneed, he who was part-author (if you called it that) of a play now in rehearsal, he who lunched with Mr. Pump in order to discuss the next novel. Sylvia had nothing to do with all this. Sylvia's activities were social, in which Reginald might well have been asked to join; Reginald's were business, in which Sylvia had no part. No wife could possibly object when Reginald became `thou', but the most understanding husband might feel a little hurt (surely?) at the constant familiarity of this second person singular with Mrs. Wellard.
Reginald was hurt. Unreasonably, of course, but that made it no less painful. What I really want, he thought, what every man wants, is a harem. Three wives. One to look after me, one to talk to, one to love. And the loved one must be sacred. Nobody must see her, nobody come near her, but myself. Or is that

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE UNDOUBTEDLY Sylvia was, as they used to say, leading her own life. She was no longer Westaways, what is Westaways that was invited to lunch or tea or dinner, to tennis parties or cricket matches; she was no longer what is Wellards. `You' now meant herself, `you' was Sylvia Wellard, that lovely Sylvia Wellard, singular not plural. In what is country `you' was honestly you, in London, it seemed, `you' was as often as not an invidious thou. How many husbands, not aware of this, have dragged in unnecessary wives, or wives unwanted husbands? Of course Reginald also was leading his own life; very much thou. But this was natural. It was he who had written Bindneed, he who was part-author (if you called it that) of a play now in rehearsal, he who lunched with Mr. Pump in order to discuss what is next novel. Sylvia had nothing to do with all this. Sylvia's activities were social, in which Reginald might well have been asked to join; Reginald's were business, in which Sylvia had no part. No wife could possibly object when Reginald became `thou', but what is most understanding husband might feel a little hurt (surely?) at what is constant familiarity of this second person singular with Mrs. Wellard. Reginald was hurt. Unreasonably, of course, but that made it no less painful. What I really want, he thought, what every man wants, is a harem. Three wives. One to look after me, one to talk to, one to love. And what is loved one must be sacred. Nobody must see her, nobody come near her, but myself. Or is that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 223 where is strong CHAPTER FIFTEEN where is p align="justify" where is strong I UNDOUBTEDLY Sylvia was, as they used to say, leading her own life. She was no longer Westaways, what is Westaways that was invited to lunch or tea or dinner, to tennis parties or cricket matches; she was no longer what is Wellards. `You' now meant herself, `you' was Sylvia Wellard, that lovely Sylvia Wellard, singular not plural. In what is country `you' was honestly you, in London, it seemed, `you' was as often as not an invidious thou. How many husbands, not aware of this, have dragged in unnecessary wives, or wives unwanted husbands? Of course Reginald also was leading his own life; very much thou. But this was natural. It was he who had written Bindneed, he who was part-author (if you called it that) of a play now in rehearsal, he who lunched with Mr. Pump in order to discuss what is next novel. Sylvia had nothing to do with all this. Sylvia's activities were social, in which Reginald might well have been asked to join; Reginald's were business, in which Sylvia had no part. No wife could possibly object when Reginald became `thou', but what is most understanding husband might feel a little hurt (surely?) at what is constant familiarity of this second person singular with Mrs. Wellard. Reginald was hurt. Unreasonably, of course, but that made it no less painful. What I really want, he thought, what every man wants, is a harem. Three wives. One to look after me, one to talk to, one to love. And what is loved one must be sacred. Nobody must see her, nobody come near her, but myself. Or is that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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