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Page 214

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

Lady Ormsby and her father were much in each other's company. Ormsby had an amused tolerance for his father-in-law, which sometimes, to his surprise, degenerated into a sort of affectionate admiration. The old boy was as mad as a hatter, of course, but he was distinctly a figure. It seems absurd that a man of fifty-five, and Robert, first Baron Ormsby at that, should have a fatherin-law at all, but if he must have one, let him be anything rather than a nonentity. Everybody in London knew Mr. Fondeveril by sight; everybody was either impressed by him or amused. Of how many fathers-in-law could that be said? Ormsby could afford to show his gratitude.
He showed it. Mr. Fondeveril became a feature of the official Ormsby establishment. Maggie was encouraged to have him about the house, to display him at parties, even to console herself with him at week-ends when Bob was, unfortunately, called away. Better keep a room for him, eh, old girl, and any time you feel lonely-? And I'll see to it that he's all right. By all right he meant had money to spend. It was as well that he did see to it, for the pension from the teabroker's might just have kept its late accountant in dress-shirts for the innumerable supper-parties, but would do no more. Ormsbp, feeling an unaccustomed virtue in the action, furnished a flat for his father-inlaw in New Cavendish Street, the district being chosen with the good-humoured mischief of one who knew his man. Mr. Fondeveril could imagine himself, if he liked, a man-about-town with a West End address, or, just as easily, if he preferred it, a fashionable consultant with a home elsewhere. Mr. Fondeveril did both. Ordering this or that from a stationer's, he might choose to say, `I think you had better send it to my consulting-rooms,' and then, raising his hand and frowning to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Lady Ormsby and her father were much in each other's company. Ormsby had an amused tolerance for his father-in-law, which sometimes, to his surprise, degenerated into a sort of affectionate admiration. what is old boy was as mad as a hatter, of course, but he was distinctly a figure. It seems absurd that a man of fifty-five, and Robert, first Baron Ormsby at that, should have a fatherin-law at all, but if he must have one, let him be anything rather than a nonentity. Everybody in London knew Mr. Fondeveril by sight; everybody was either impressed by him or amused. Of how many fathers-in-law could that be said? Ormsby could afford to show his gratitude. He showed it. Mr. Fondeveril became a feature of what is official Ormsby establishment. Maggie was encouraged to have him about what is house, to display him at parties, even to console herself with him at week-ends when Bob was, unfortunately, called away. Better keep a room for him, eh, old girl, and any time you feel lonely-? And I'll see to it that he's all right. By all right he meant had money to spend. It was as well that he did see to it, for what is pension from what is teabroker's might just have kept its late accountant in dress-shirts for what is innumerable supper-parties, but would do no more. Ormsbp, feeling an unaccustomed virtue in what is action, furnished a flat for his father-inlaw in New Cavendish Street, what is district being chosen with what is good-humoured mischief of one who knew his man. Mr. Fondeveril could imagine himself, if he liked, a man-about-town with a West End address, or, just as easily, if he preferred it, a fashionable consultant with a home elsewhere. Mr. Fondeveril did both. Ordering this or that from a stationer's, he might choose to say, `I think you had better send it to my consulting-rooms,' and then, raising his hand and frowning to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 214 where is strong CHAPTER FOURTEEN where is p align="justify" Lady Ormsby and her father were much in each other's company. Ormsby had an amused tolerance for his father-in-law, which sometimes, to his surprise, degenerated into a sort of affectionate admiration. what is old boy was as mad as a hatter, of course, but he was distinctly a figure. It seems absurd that a man of fifty-five, and Robert, first Baron Ormsby at that, should have a fatherin-law at all, but if he must have one, let him be anything rather than a nonentity. Everybody in London knew Mr. Fondeveril by sight; everybody was either impressed by him or amused. Of how many fathers-in-law could that be said? Ormsby could afford to show his gratitude. He showed it. Mr. Fondeveril became a feature of what is official Ormsby establishment. Maggie was encouraged to have him about what is house, to display him at parties, even to console herself with him at week-ends when Bob was, unfortunately, called away. Better keep a room for him, eh, old girl, and any time you feel lonely-? And I'll see to it that he's all right. By all right he meant had money to spend. It was as well that he did see to it, for what is pension from what is teabroker's might just have kept its late accountant in dress-shirts for what is innumerable supper-parties, but would do no more. Ormsbp, feeling an unaccustomed virtue in what is action, furnished a flat for his father-inlaw in New Cavendish Street, what is district being chosen with what is good-humoured mischief of one who knew his man. Mr. Fondeveril could imagine himself, if he liked, a man-about-town with a West End address, or, just as easily, if he preferred it, a fashionable consultant with a home elsewhere. Mr. Fondeveril did both. Ordering this or that from a stationer's, he might choose to say, `I think you had better send it to my consulting-rooms,' and then, raising his hand and frowning to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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