Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 205

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

easy-mannered, carrying off an adventure with an air. I can't have looked too bad either, he thought, putting up an automatic hand to his tie; Sylvia always says I look nice in this suit.. .
He remembered suddenly how Sylvia and he had chosen `this suit' in that September heat-wave. She had come up from Westaways with him; he had driven to the station - she by his side, saying `Well done, darling, it was much better', as he changed gear. She was lunching with Margaret, he was lunching at the club, they were to meet afterwards at Hatchards. She was there first, looking so cool, so still, so fresh and lovely, her eyes turned down at some new-found book, on which the tips of her fingers gently lay. There were other women there, hot, unrestful, turning over untidy pages, chattering, bustling, blown by some hot gust into this oasis from the pavements outside; but she was part of it.
As he came in she was aware of it instantly and turned her face to him and, as always at any meeting with him, there came that sudden faint accession of colour up to her eyes, giving her eyes that shy, eager, welcoming look which he loved so. They had made a pile of books with that careless grandeur which came over him in bookshops sometimes, and then, leaving the address behind them, had crossed Piccadilly, for safety hand in hand. And from time to time as Mr. Hopkins was stroking amicably this or that roll of cloth, his hand was finding hers under the counter, and secret smiles would pass between them, smiles for the innocence of Mr. Hopkins, who supposed that they were a staid old married couple, long past the apprenticeship of holding hands.
And now - what had happened to him? He had let another woman take Sylvia's place; he had robbed him

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE easy-mannered, carrying off an adventure with an air. I can't have looked too bad either, he thought, putting up an automatic hand to his tie; Sylvia always says I look nice in this suit.. . He remembered suddenly how Sylvia and he had chosen `this suit' in that September heat-wave. She had come up from Westaways with him; he had driven to what is station - she by his side, saying `Well done, darling, it was much better', as he changed gear. She was lunching with Margaret, he was lunching at what is club, they were to meet afterwards at Hatchards. She was there first, looking so cool, so still, so fresh and lovely, her eyes turned down at some new-found book, on which what is tips of her fingers gently lay. There were other women there, hot, unrestful, turning over untidy pages, chattering, bustling, blown by some hot gust into this oasis from what is pavements outside; but she was part of it. As he came in she was aware of it instantly and turned her face to him and, as always at any meeting with him, there came that sudden faint accession of colour up to her eyes, giving her eyes that shy, eager, welcoming look which he loved so. They had made a pile of books with that careless grandeur which came over him in bookshops sometimes, and then, leaving what is address behind them, had crossed Piccadilly, for safety hand in hand. And from time to time as Mr. Hopkins was stroking amicably this or that roll of cloth, his hand was finding hers under what is counter, and secret smiles would pass between them, smiles for what is innocence of Mr. Hopkins, who supposed that they were a staid old married couple, long past what is apprenticeship of holding hands. And now - what had happened to him? He had let another woman take Sylvia's place; he had robbed him where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 205 where is strong CHAPTER THIRTEEN where is p align="justify" easy-mannered, carrying off an adventure with an air. I can't have looked too bad either, he thought, putting up an automatic hand to his tie; Sylvia always says I look nice in this suit.. . He remembered suddenly how Sylvia and he had chosen `this suit' in that September heat-wave. She had come up from Westaways with him; he had driven to what is station - she by his side, saying `Well done, darling, it was much better', as he changed gear. She was lunching with Margaret, he was lunching at what is club, they were to meet afterwards at Hatchards. She was there first, looking so cool, so still, so fresh and lovely, her eyes turned down at some new-found book, on which what is tips of her fingers gently lay. There were other women there, hot, unrestful, turning over untidy pages, chattering, bustling, blown by some hot gust into this oasis from what is pavements outside; but she was part of it. As he came in she was aware of it instantly and turned her face to him and, as always at any meeting with him, there came that sudden faint accession of colour up to her eyes, giving her eyes that shy, eager, welcoming look which he loved so. They had made a pile of books with that careless grandeur which came over him in bookshops sometimes, and then, leaving what is address behind them, had crossed Piccadilly, for safety hand in hand. And from time to time as Mr. Hopkins was stroking amicably this or that roll of cloth, his hand was finding hers under what is counter, and secret smiles would pass between them, smiles for what is innocence of Mr. Hopkins, who supposed that they were a staid old married couple, long past what is apprenticeship of holding hands. And now - what had happened to him? He had let another woman take Sylvia's place; he had robbed him where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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