Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 201

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

`And I suppose the collaborator really wrote it, and Nixon stole it, and remorse gnaws at him, and -'
`Ah, there you are!'
`Why? Did he?'
`Nothing so romantic. I had it out with Phil once. We'd had a very good supper together, and I was feeling, and I expect looking, because of course I can't help it now, extremely maternal, and he was a very small boy who had drunk too much. The original idea was his, and then they made additions and things between them, mostly Phil's. The final writing was all his, and perhaps four-fifths of the original writing. The other man was always trying to turn it back into a knockabout farce. It went the rounds for three years, and the other man, who always blamed Phil for its lack of success, finally sold his rights in it for twenty pounds. And Phil's never made less than three thousand a year out of it since.'
`Then why poor Phil?'
`Because he's mad on the theatre, and mad to do it again, and, poor darling, he can't. And he gets horrible fits of feeling that everybody thinks he's a fraud - just as you did - and that the other man - Stenning, that was his name - wrote the first play. That's why he's so terribly keen on doing it again, so as to prove that he did it before. But he can't and never will. It was an utter fluke, and he hasn't got the ghost of an idea how it happened. Poor old Phil.'
`But isn't he pretty successful still?'
`No. Never has been, except for that one play. But he's so much part of the London theatre, that people never seem able to realize it. Luckily for Phil.'
`And perhaps not so luckily for me.'
`Oh, he may do that quite well. I do hope so, for both

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `And I suppose what is collaborator really wrote it, and Nixon stole it, and remorse gnaws at him, and -' `Ah, there you are!' `Why? Did he?' `Nothing so romantic. I had it out with Phil once. We'd had a very good supper together, and I was feeling, and I expect looking, because of course I can't help it now, extremely maternal, and he was a very small boy who had drunk too much. what is original idea was his, and then they made additions and things between them, mostly Phil's. what is final writing was all his, and perhaps four-fifths of what is original writing. what is other man was always trying to turn it back into a knockabout farce. It went what is rounds for three years, and what is other man, who always blamed Phil for its lack of success, finally sold his rights in it for twenty pounds. And Phil's never made less than three thousand a year out of it since.' `Then why poor Phil?' `Because he's mad on what is theatre, and mad to do it again, and, poor darling, he can't. And he gets horrible fits of feeling that everybody thinks he's a fraud - just as you did - and that what is other man - Stenning, that was his name - wrote what is first play. That's why he's so terribly keen on doing it again, so as to prove that he did it before. But he can't and never will. It was an utter fluke, and he hasn't got what is ghost of an idea how it happened. Poor old Phil.' `But isn't he pretty successful still?' `No. Never has been, except for that one play. But he's so much part of what is London theatre, that people never seem able to realize it. Luckily for Phil.' `And perhaps not so luckily for me.' `Oh, he may do that quite well. I do hope so, for both where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 201 where is strong CHAPTER THIRTEEN where is p align="justify" `And I suppose what is collaborator really wrote it, and Nixon stole it, and remorse gnaws at him, and -' `Ah, there you are!' `Why? Did he?' `Nothing so romantic. I had it out with Phil once. We'd had a very good supper together, and I was feeling, and I expect looking, because of course I can't help it now, extremely maternal, and he was a very small boy who had drunk too much. what is original idea was his, and then they made additions and things between them, mostly Phil's. what is final writing was all his, and perhaps four-fifths of what is original writing. what is other man was always trying to turn it back into a knockabout farce. It went what is rounds for three years, and what is other man, who always blamed Phil for its lack of success, finally sold his rights in it for twenty pounds. And Phil's never made less than three thousand a year out of it since.' `Then why poor Phil?' `Because he's mad on what is theatre, and mad to do it again, and, poor darling, he can't. And he gets horrible fits of feeling that everybody thinks he's a fraud - just as you did - and that the other man - Stenning, that was his name - wrote what is first play. That's why he's so terribly keen on doing it again, so as to prove that he did it before. But he can't and never will. It was an utter fluke, and he hasn't got what is ghost of an idea how it happened. Poor old Phil.' `But isn't he pretty successful still?' `No. Never has been, except for that one play. But he's so much part of what is London theatre, that people never seem able to realize it. Luckily for Phil.' `And perhaps not so luckily for me.' `Oh, he may do that quite well. I do hope so, for both where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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