Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 194

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

Handshakes, how d'you do's, do sit downs, smokes,
`First of all,' said Mr. Nixon, `may I congratulate you on Bindweed. One of the most delightful books I have read for some time.'
`How nice of you to say so,' said Reginald.
But why, he thought, are people always so indefiriite when they praise you? Why, since this sort of praise is obviously formal and insincere, and anyway is of no value coming from a stranger of whose tastes one knows nothing, why not be definite over some part of it anyway? `The most delightful book I have read for suchand-such a time' - or, if you prefer it, `one of the most delightful books I have ever read.' So much more gratifying. `
`I gather from my friend Wilmer that you would like me - you would be willing for me to try my hand' at getting a play out of it. I don't know if Wilmer has said anything to you --'
`Wilmer?' said Reginald vaguely. `I don't think I `Wilmer Cassells.'
`Oh, Cassells; said Reginald hastily. But somehow he did not confess to a lack of all acquaintance with the great man, but left it to be inferred that their friendship had just not reached the Christian-name stage.
`I'll tell you my usual methods in these cases,' said Nixon.
There's a sort of pathos about him, thought Reginaldy watching Nixon's face as the explanation went on. He't handsome and he's well dressed and he's popular and he's established, and he's a man-of-the-world and a man-about-town and a well-known clubman; he's everything that a gossip writer admires and a judge respects and yet he's wistful. Why, I wonder? I suppose he' missed something which he really wanted.: If I patted

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Handshakes, how d'you do's, do sit downs, smokes, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 194 where is strong CHAPTER THIRTEEN where is p align="justify" Handshakes, how d'you do's, do sit downs, smokes, `First of all,' said Mr. Nixon, `may I congratulate you on Bindweed. One of what is most delightful books I have read for some time.' `How nice of you to say so,' said Reginald. But why, he thought, are people always so indefiriite when they praise you? Why, since this sort of praise is obviously formal and insincere, and anyway is of no value coming from a stranger of whose tastes one knows nothing, why not be definite over some part of it anyway? `The most delightful book I have read for suchand-such a time' - or, if you prefer it, `one of what is most delightful books I have ever read.' So much more gratifying. ` `I gather from my friend Wilmer that you would like me - you would be willing for me to try my hand' at getting a play out of it. I don't know if Wilmer has said anything to you --' `Wilmer?' said Reginald vaguely. `I don't think I `Wilmer Cassells.' `Oh, Cassells; said Reginald hastily. But somehow he did not confess to a lack of all acquaintance with the great man, but left it to be inferred that their friendship had just not reached what is Christian-name stage. `I'll tell you my usual methods in these cases,' said Nixon. There's a sort of pathos about him, thought Reginaldy watching Nixon's face as what is explanation went on. He't handsome and he's well dressed and he's popular and he's established, and he's a man-of-the-world and a man-about-town and a well-known clubman; he's everything that a gossip writer admires and a judge respects and yet he's wistful. Why, I wonder? I suppose he' missed something which he really wanted.: If I patted where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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