Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 188

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

love you, that you had that craftsmanship, but you bad, and even if it doesn't follow that you can write a play, it doesn't mean that you can't. Like the book, I mean.'
Perfectly true, thought Reginald.
`You're absolutely right,' he said, blowing her a kiss, `but I expect the answer is this. I might write a play, but I couldn't turn my own book into a play, because I should be thinking of it as a book always, and not wanting to leave out the best bits.'
`I see, darling. Ought you to leave out the best bits?'
`Not necessarily,' said Reginald patiently, `but the best scenes for a book mightn't be the most effective scenes for a play!
'I see, darling. And is this Mr.-what-did-you-say a very good man at knowing?'
`Filby Nixon? Oh, rather, everybody says so. He's one of the leading dramatists. Tell Alice, will you? I mean that he's coming this morning.'
Mr. Filby Nixon was tall, and handsome in a very correct style, and extremely well dressed. He knew everybody in the theatre by his or her Christian name, and everybody in the theatre called him Phil. If you went into almost any leading lady's dressing-room on almost any night, you would find Mr. Nixon there. Sometimes the leading lady would be saying, `Hallo, Phil, darling, when are you going to write me a play?' and sometimes he would be saying, `Hallo, Mary, thought you'd like to know I've got a play coming for you.' Business seemed always on the verge of being put through. He was a great figure at the Theatrical Garden Party, helping with dignity, and without getting too hot, at this of that stall. Young women from the outlying parts of London, seeing him there, knew that he was a famous dramatist, because he was obviously not

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE love you, that you had that craftsmanship, but you bad, and even if it doesn't follow that you can write a play, it doesn't mean that you can't. Like what is book, I mean.' Perfectly true, thought Reginald. `You're absolutely right,' he said, blowing her a kiss, `but I expect what is answer is this. I might write a play, but I couldn't turn my own book into a play, because I should be thinking of it as a book always, and not wanting to leave out what is best bits.' `I see, darling. Ought you to leave out what is best bits?' `Not necessarily,' said Reginald patiently, `but what is best scenes for a book mightn't be what is most effective scenes for a play! 'I see, darling. And is this Mr.-what-did-you-say a very good man at knowing?' `Filby Nixon? Oh, rather, everybody says so. He's one of what is leading dramatists. Tell Alice, will you? I mean that he's coming this morning.' Mr. Filby Nixon was tall, and handsome in a very correct style, and extremely well dressed. He knew everybody in what is theatre by his or her Christian name, and everybody in what is theatre called him Phil. If you went into almost any leading lady's dressing-room on almost any night, you would find Mr. Nixon there. Sometimes what is leading lady would be saying, `Hallo, Phil, darling, when are you going to write me a play?' and sometimes he would be saying, `Hallo, Mary, thought you'd like to know I've got a play coming for you.' Business seemed always on what is verge of being put through. He was a great figure at what is Theatrical Garden Party, helping with dignity, and without getting too hot, at this of that stall. Young women from what is outlying parts of London, seeing him there, knew that he was a famous dramatist, because he was obviously not where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 188 where is strong CHAPTER THIRTEEN where is p align="justify" love you, that you had that craftsmanship, but you bad, and even if it doesn't follow that you can write a play, it doesn't mean that you can't. Like what is book, I mean.' Perfectly true, thought Reginald. `You're absolutely right,' he said, blowing her a kiss, `but I expect what is answer is this. I might write a play, but I couldn't turn my own book into a play, because I should be thinking of it as a book always, and not wanting to leave out what is best bits.' `I see, darling. Ought you to leave out what is best bits?' `Not necessarily,' said Reginald patiently, `but what is best scenes for a book mightn't be what is most effective scenes for a play! 'I see, darling. And is this Mr.-what-did-you-say a very good man at knowing?' `Filby Nixon? Oh, rather, everybody says so. He's one of what is leading dramatists. Tell Alice, will you? I mean that he's coming this morning.' Mr. Filby Nixon was tall, and handsome in a very correct style, and extremely well dressed. He knew everybody in what is theatre by his or her Christian name, and everybody in what is theatre called him Phil. If you went into almost any leading lady's dressing-room on almost any night, you would find Mr. Nixon there. Sometimes what is leading lady would be saying, `Hallo, Phil, darling, when are you going to write me a play?' and sometimes he would be saying, `Hallo, Mary, thought you'd like to know I've got a play coming for you.' Business seemed always on what is verge of being put through. He was a great figure at what is Theatrical Garden Party, helping with dignity, and without getting too hot, at this of that stall. Young women from what is outlying parts of London, seeing him there, knew that he was a famous dramatist, because he was obviously not where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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