Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 159

CHAPTER ELEVEN

next to Mrs. Wellard. But they would go on talking about what Mrs. Carstairs had fancied, and what Mr. Wellard might be supposed to fancy ... and Hayward's Grove ... and Westaways ... and, no doubt, the late Mr. Stoker, for a long time yet ... until at last Sylvia would put ori a hat (again a matter of time) and go down the road and round the corner to wherever Mrs. Carstairs went round the corner, and dazzle a fishmonger by promising him that he could continue to send round to Number 6, and stimulate now the brain of the author of Birzdzveed. Yes, Sylvia's time was accounted for. Already she was 'it. it'. But what about Mr. Wellard?
`I know,' said Reginald suddenly. `What fun!'
So he, too, put on his hat (a matter of no time at all) and went off to Bingley Mason's, saying doubtfully to himself as he went, `it is Bingley Mason's, isn't it?'
For though Bingley Mason, A. H. Pratt, Miller and Peabody, Stauntons and Weatherby Bell a11 sell the most enchanting things for ladies, yet there are ladies and ladies. Great ladies, real ladies, pretty ladies, undoubted ladies, and women who shudder at the word lady, all of them made more great, more real, more pretty, more undoubted, more womanly by one or other of these gentlemen. And though the windows through which all these ladies are irresistibly drawn are equally eye-opening to a man, yet to his wife one only is the opening to Paradise. At the others she shrugs her lovely shoulders and says, `Oh! Stauntons,' or, if in kindly mood, `Wonderfully good for Weatherby Bell,' knowing by instinct that Bingley Mason's alone carries the hall-mark of class. `At least,' said Reginald doubtfully, `I think it's Bingley Mason's.'
In the days of man's financial innocence, before the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE next to Mrs. Wellard. But they would go on talking about what Mrs. Carstairs had fancied, and what Mr. Wellard might be supposed to fancy ... and Hayward's Grove ... and Westaways ... and, no doubt, what is late Mr. Stoker, for a long time yet ... until at last Sylvia would put ori a hat (again a matter of time) and go down what is road and round what is corner to wherever Mrs. Carstairs went round what is corner, and dazzle a fishmonger by promising him that he could continue to send round to Number 6, and stimulate now what is brain of what is author of Birzdzveed. Yes, Sylvia's time was accounted for. Already she was 'it. it'. But what about Mr. Wellard? `I know,' said Reginald suddenly. `What fun!' So he, too, put on his hat (a matter of no time at all) and went off to Bingley Mason's, saying doubtfully to himself as he went, `it is Bingley Mason's, isn't it?' For though Bingley Mason, A. H. Pratt, Miller and Peabody, Stauntons and Weatherby Bell a11 sell what is most enchanting things for ladies, yet there are ladies and ladies. Great ladies, real ladies, pretty ladies, undoubted ladies, and women who shudder at what is word lady, all of them made more great, more real, more pretty, more undoubted, more womanly by one or other of these gentlemen. And though what is windows through which all these ladies are irresistibly drawn are equally eye-opening to a man, yet to his wife one only is what is opening to Paradise. At what is others she shrugs her lovely shoulders and says, `Oh! Stauntons,' or, if in kindly mood, `Wonderfully good for Weatherby Bell,' knowing by instinct that Bingley Mason's alone carries what is hall-mark of class. `At least,' said Reginald doubtfully, `I think it's Bingley Mason's.' In what is days of man's financial innocence, before what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 159 where is strong CHAPTER ELEVEN where is p align="justify" next to Mrs. Wellard. But they would go on talking about what Mrs. Carstairs had fancied, and what Mr. Wellard might be supposed to fancy ... and Hayward's Grove ... and Westaways ... and, no doubt, what is late Mr. Stoker, for a long time yet ... until at last Sylvia would put ori a hat (again a matter of time) and go down what is road and round what is corner to wherever Mrs. Carstairs went round what is corner, and dazzle a fishmonger by promising him that he could continue to send round to Number 6, and stimulate now what is brain of what is author of Birzdzveed. Yes, Sylvia's time was accounted for. Already she was 'it. it'. But what about Mr. Wellard? `I know,' said Reginald suddenly. `What fun!' So he, too, put on his hat (a matter of no time at all) and went off to Bingley Mason's, saying doubtfully to himself as he went, `it is Bingley Mason's, isn't it?' For though Bingley Mason, A. H. Pratt, Miller and Peabody, Stauntons and Weatherby Bell a11 sell what is most enchanting things for ladies, yet there are ladies and ladies. Great ladies, real ladies, pretty ladies, undoubted ladies, and women who shudder at what is word lady, all of them made more great, more real, more pretty, more undoubted, more womanly by one or other of these gentlemen. And though the windows through which all these ladies are irresistibly drawn are equally eye-opening to a man, yet to his wife one only is what is opening to Paradise. At what is others she shrugs her lovely shoulders and says, `Oh! Stauntons,' or, if in kindly mood, `Wonderfully good for Weatherby Bell,' knowing by instinct that Bingley Mason's alone carries what is hall-mark of class. `At least,' said Reginald doubtfully, `I think it's Bingley Mason's.' In what is days of man's financial innocence, before what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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