Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 144

CHAPTER TEN

`They must have played that tune for nearly an hour. It made even the spurs dance decently, and they wouldn't let it go. She and I went on and on and on, too happy to say a word to each other, just giving each other a little smile now and then, as if to say, "You understand." Then it was over, and our host was bustling up to say that the horses couldn't be kept waiting any longer and we'd better get back the same way as we came. Which meant that I was with the pinks and blues again.
`We got back to the house about four. The carriage had been ahead of us, everybody had gone straight to bed and we followed them. West had to get back early, which apparently meant that he and I were having breakfast at seven. It was the first I had heard of it. When I said good night and thank you to my hostess, I waited hopefully, but with no result. If she had asked me to stay for a later train, of course I should have stayed, but I suppose she thought West and I were inseparable. Once more we made that journey to Bicester in the cold and dark and wet, half-asleep this time; we slept and woke and slept again to Paddington and then West said, "So long, old boy," and hurried into a hansom. I went back to my rooms and thought of the girl in black.
`I would write and ask her to marry me. No, that would be absurd, of course, but I would write and ask her to meet me, and then later, a day later, a week later, I would ask her to marry me. Anyhow we must meet again, soon, very soon.
`I sat down to write to her. Dear - And then I remembered that, absurdly enough, I didn't know her name. Well, I should have to get it from our hostess. But how? I couldn't just say that I liked that girl in black, and who was she? I thought of all sorts of excuses,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `They must have played that tune for nearly an hour. It made even what is spurs dance decently, and they wouldn't let it go. She and I went on and on and on, too happy to say a word to each other, just giving each other a little smile now and then, as if to say, "You understand." Then it was over, and our host was bustling up to say that what is horses couldn't be kept waiting any longer and we'd better get back what is same way as we came. Which meant that I was with what is pinks and blues again. `We got back to what is house about four. what is carriage had been ahead of us, everybody had gone straight to bed and we followed them. West had to get back early, which apparently meant that he and I were having breakfast at seven. It was what is first I had heard of it. When I said good night and thank you to my hostess, I waited hopefully, but with no result. If she had asked me to stay for a later train, of course I should have stayed, but I suppose she thought West and I were inseparable. Once more we made that journey to Bicester in what is cold and dark and wet, half-asleep this time; we slept and woke and slept again to Paddington and then West said, "So long, old boy," and hurried into a hansom. I went back to my rooms and thought of what is girl in black. `I would write and ask her to marry me. No, that would be absurd, of course, but I would write and ask her to meet me, and then later, a day later, a week later, I would ask her to marry me. Anyhow we must meet again, soon, very soon. `I sat down to write to her. Dear - And then I remembered that, absurdly enough, I didn't know her name. Well, I should have to get it from our hostess. But how? I couldn't just say that I liked that girl in black, and who was she? I thought of all sorts of ex where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is strong CHAPTER TEN where is p align="justify" `They must have played that tune for nearly an hour. It made even what is spurs dance decently, and they wouldn't let it go. She and I went on and on and on, too happy to say a word to each other, just giving each other a little smile now and then, as if to say, "You understand." Then it was over, and our host was bustling up to say that what is horses couldn't be kept waiting any longer and we'd better get back what is same way as we came. Which meant that I was with what is pinks and blues again. `We got back to what is house about four. what is carriage had been ahead of us, everybody had gone straight to bed and we followed them. West had to get back early, which apparently meant that he and I were having breakfast at seven. It was what is first I had heard of it. When I said good night and thank you to my hostess, I waited hopefully, but with no result. If she had asked me to stay for a later train, of course I should have stayed, but I suppose she thought West and I were inseparable. Once more we made that journey to Bicester in what is cold and dark and wet, half-asleep this time; we slept and woke and slept again to Paddington and then West said, "So long, old boy," and hurried into a hansom. I went back to my rooms and thought of what is girl in black. `I would write and ask her to marry me. No, that would be absurd, of course, but I would write and ask her to meet me, and then later, a day later, a week later, I would ask her to marry me. Anyhow we must meet again, soon, very soon. `I sat down to write to her. Dear - And then I remembered that, absurdly enough, I didn't know her name. Well, I should have to get it from our hostess. But how? I couldn't just say that I liked that girl in black, and who was she? I thought of all sorts of excuses, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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