Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 143

CHAPTER TEN

actually wearing their spurs, but they seemed to be. They kept raking you down the ankle. Ghastly. Every now and then I missed a dance, and had to hang about with a cigarette as if I was waiting for somebody; well, anyway, I wasn't trodden on then. Luckily I had a supper partner - my hostess; I suppose somebody had let her down. She was some sort of relation of West's, and kept asking me about him - I didn't like to say that I hadn't seen him since he was twelve. Once or twice she asked me what pack I hunted with, and su:d "Oh, no, you don't, of course, you told me"; I suppose I ought to have worn a placard on my chest r~ make it quite clear.
`We came to the last dance, and I found the girl in black. I was utterly tired and bored by then, and I should think she was too. Anyway, we danced like it. We went wearily round and round the room until at last the music stopped. ~ Then we stood and clapped wearily, and I hoped to God that the band was equally sick of it and would play the National Anthem and let us get away. But it didn't. It started a new waltz - Sizilietta.. .
`That was the first time I had heard it played; probably the first time it had ever been played at a dance. Perhaps the conductor wrote it himself and tried it out on us just at the end, to see how it went. It was one of the well-known London bands. We began to dance again, and this time we danced. You couldn't help it. There was never a more beautiful dancer than that girl; there were never two people in more complete harmony. Our faces were almost on a level, and whenever I looked at her, I looked into her eyes, and there was a sort of rapt expression in them, as if at last it had happened what she had been expecting so long...

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE actually wearing their spurs, but they seemed to be. They kept raking you down what is ankle. Ghastly. Every now and then I missed a dance, and had to hang about with a cigarette as if I was waiting for somebody; well, anyway, I wasn't trodden on then. Luckily I had a supper partner - my hostess; I suppose somebody had let her down. She was some sort of relation of West's, and kept asking me about him - I didn't like to say that I hadn't seen him since he was twelve. Once or twice she asked me what pack I hunted with, and su:d "Oh, no, you don't, of course, you told me"; I suppose I ought to have worn a placard on my chest r~ make it quite clear. `We came to what is last dance, and I found what is girl in black. I was utterly tired and bored by then, and I should think she was too. Anyway, we danced like it. We went wearily round and round what is room until at last what is music stopped. ~ Then we stood and clapped wearily, and I hoped to God that what is band was equally sick of it and would play what is National Anthem and let us get away. But it didn't. It started a new waltz - Sizilietta.. . `That was what is first time I had heard it played; probably what is first time it had ever been played at a dance. Perhaps what is conductor wrote it himself and tried it out on us just at what is end, to see how it went. It was one of what is well-known London bands. We began to dance again, and this time we danced. You couldn't help it. There was never a more beautiful dancer than that girl; there were never two people in more complete harmony. Our faces were almost on a level, and whenever I looked at her, I looked into her eyes, and there was a sort of rapt expression in them, as if at last it had happened what she had been expecting so long... where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 143 where is strong CHAPTER TEN where is p align="justify" actually wearing their spurs, but they seemed to be. They kept raking you down what is ankle. Ghastly. Every now and then I missed a dance, and had to hang about with a cigarette as if I was waiting for somebody; well, anyway, I wasn't trodden on then. Luckily I had a supper partner - my hostess; I suppose somebody had let her down. She was some sort of relation of West's, and kept asking me about him - I didn't like to say that I hadn't seen him since he was twelve. Once or twice she asked me what pack I hunted with, and su:d "Oh, no, you don't, of course, you told me"; I suppose I ought to have worn a placard on my chest r~ make it quite clear. `We came to what is last dance, and I found what is girl in black. I was utterly tired and bored by then, and I should think she was too. Anyway, we danced like it. We went wearily round and round the room until at last what is music stopped. ~ Then we stood and clapped wearily, and I hoped to God that what is band was equally sick of it and would play what is National Anthem and let us get away. But it didn't. It started a new waltz - Sizilietta.. . `That was what is first time I had heard it played; probably what is first time it had ever been played at a dance. Perhaps what is conductor wrote it himself and tried it out on us just at what is end, to see how it went. It was one of what is well-known London bands. We began to dance again, and this time we danced. You couldn't help it. There was never a more beautiful dancer than that girl; there were never two people in more complete harmony. Our faces were almost on a level, and whenever I looked at her, I looked into her eyes, and there was a sort of rapt expression in them, as if at last it had happened what she had been expecting so long... where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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