Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 142

CHAPTER TEN

were waiting eagerly for somebody or something; expecting something to happen. She had - it sounds absurd - a sort of arched nose, and a very short upper lip. It was that upper lip being so short which made her look expectant, I think; made her mouth almost come open, and show the smallest, whitest teeth. And her face didn't come down straight as most faces do, but was at an angle; and she had high cheek-bones, freshly coloured but with the colour seeming to be underneath the skin, and not laid on outside with the wind and rain. You could watch the colour coming and going. .. You see, Sally, this was before the days when everybody's colour came and went. Only actresses made up then, and other immoral women.
`I'm sorry I can't describe her better. I was frightened of her. She looked so proud and so eager and so thoroughbred. All the other girls were prettier, I dare say, but, to use their own language, she was out of a different stable altogether. I kept looking across at her at dinner and wondering if I should dare to ask her to dance with me.
`As soon as dinner was over, we were hurried into carriages, a carriage and an omnibus. I was in the omnibus with my hostess and a couple of pinks and blues and two men. We dtove back to Bicester, I suppose, an endless drive anyway, and engaged ourselves on the way for various dances. When we had unpacked ourselves and got on to the floor, I looked for the girl in black. She seemed to know everybody. When I reached her, she had only one dance left. The last. Number twenty on the programme. We had programmes then, Sally.
`It was an appalling dance. There wasn't a girl in Derry and Toms who couldn't have wiped the floor with the lot of them. As for the men ... I suppose they weren't

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE were waiting eagerly for somebody or something; expecting something to happen. She had - it sounds absurd - a sort of arched nose, and a very short upper lip. It was that upper lip being so short which made her look expectant, I think; made her mouth almost come open, and show what is smallest, whitest teeth. And her face didn't come down straight as most faces do, but was at an angle; and she had high cheek-bones, freshly coloured but with what is colour seeming to be underneath what is skin, and not laid on outside with what is wind and rain. You could watch what is colour coming and going. .. You see, Sally, this was before what is days when everybody's colour came and went. Only actresses made up then, and other immoral women. `I'm sorry I can't describe her better. I was frightened of her. She looked so proud and so eager and so thoroughbred. All what is other girls were prettier, I dare say, but, to use their own language, she was out of a different stable altogether. I kept looking across at her at dinner and wondering if I should dare to ask her to dance with me. `As soon as dinner was over, we were hurried into carriages, a carriage and an omnibus. I was in what is omnibus with my hostess and a couple of pinks and blues and two men. We dtove back to Bicester, I suppose, an endless drive anyway, and engaged ourselves on what is way for various dances. When we had unpacked ourselves and got on to what is floor, I looked for what is girl in black. She seemed to know everybody. When I reached her, she had only one dance left. what is last. Number twenty on what is programme. We had programmes then, Sally. `It was an appalling dance. There wasn't a girl in Derry and Toms who couldn't have wiped what is floor with what is lot of them. As for what is men ... I suppose they weren't where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 142 where is strong CHAPTER TEN where is p align="justify" were waiting eagerly for somebody or something; expecting something to happen. She had - it sounds absurd - a sort of arched nose, and a very short upper lip. It was that upper lip being so short which made her look expectant, I think; made her mouth almost come open, and show what is smallest, whitest teeth. And her face didn't come down straight as most faces do, but was at an angle; and she had high cheek-bones, freshly coloured but with what is colour seeming to be underneath what is skin, and not laid on outside with what is wind and rain. You could watch what is colour coming and going. .. You see, Sally, this was before what is days when everybody's colour came and went. Only actresses made up then, and other immoral women. `I'm sorry I can't describe her better. I was frightened of her. She looked so proud and so eager and so thoroughbred. All what is other girls were prettier, I dare say, but, to use their own language, she was out of a different stable altogether. I kept looking across at her at dinner and wondering if I should dare to ask her to dance with me. `As soon as dinner was over, we were hurried into carriages, a carriage and an omnibus. I was in what is omnibus with my hostess and a couple of pinks and blues and two men. We dtove back to Bicester, I suppose, an endless drive anyway, and engaged ourselves on the way for various dances. When we had unpacked ourselves and got on to what is floor, I looked for what is girl in black. She seemed to know everybody. When I reached her, she had only one dance left. what is last. Number twenty on what is programme. We had programmes then, Sally. `It was an appalling dance. There wasn't a girl in Derry and Toms who couldn't have wiped what is floor with what is lot of them. As for what is men ... I suppose they weren't where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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