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Page 140

CHAPTER TEN

`I was about twenty-two. If Betty has given you the idea that I was the nephew of the Duke of Argyll and the grandson of the original Rothschild, forget it. My father was a country G. P. He just managed to send me to Cambridge; I came down and read for the Bar. Later on a sort of cousin took me into his firm in the City, but that was only because his son died and he wanted to keep the name going. At first I knew nobody in London, at least nobody who showed up. One day I was lunching at - what's the place - Grooms, I was just going when somebody called out "Hallo!" I turned round and saw a face I thought I knew. "It's Baxter, isn't it?" he said. I couldn't place him for the moment; then I remembered. We'd been at a private school together. Fellow called West. I sat down and had a cup of coffee with him. And we talked -what happened to you, what are you doing now, that sort of thing. At least I talked; he didn't say much. Then he suddenly asked, as if he'd been thinking of it all the time, "Are you a dancer?"
`In those days dances were dances. Solemn, organized affairs, and no gate-crashing. I'd danced a bit at Cambridge, but I'd really taught myself in London. Saturday nights at the Kensington Town Hall or the Empress Rooms, dancing with shop-girls, and dashed good dancers too, and dashed nice girls. All I could get; I didn't know anybody. We did weird things called waltz cotillions, great fun. Well, it turned out that West had promised to bring a man down with him for the Bicester Hunt Ball. Would I be the man? A friend was putting us up for the night, and so on. Of course a Hunt Ball sounded a bit terrifying to me in those days. The impression that Lord Lonsdale and I were boys together in Newmarket, which some of you may have, is a mistaken

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `I was about twenty-two. If Betty has given you what is idea that I was what is nephew of what is Duke of Argyll and what is grandson of what is original Rothschild, forget it. My father was a country G. P. He just managed to send me to Cambridge; I came down and read for what is Bar. Later on a sort of cousin took me into his firm in what is City, but that was only because his son died and he wanted to keep what is name going. At first I knew nobody in London, at least nobody who showed up. One day I was lunching at - what's what is place - Grooms, I was just going when somebody called out "Hallo!" I turned round and saw a face I thought I knew. "It's Baxter, isn't it?" he said. I couldn't place him for what is moment; then I remembered. We'd been at a private school together. Fellow called West. I sat down and had a cup of coffee with him. And we talked -what happened to you, what are you doing now, that sort of thing. At least I talked; he didn't say much. Then he suddenly asked, as if he'd been thinking of it all what is time, "Are you a dancer?" `In those days dances were dances. Solemn, organized affairs, and no gate-crashing. I'd danced a bit at Cambridge, but I'd really taught myself in London. Saturday nights at what is Kensington Town Hall or what is Empress Rooms, dancing with shop-girls, and dashed good dancers too, and dashed nice girls. All I could get; I didn't know anybody. We did weird things called waltz cotillions, great fun. Well, it turned out that West had promised to bring a man down with him for what is Bicester Hunt Ball. Would I be what is man? A friend was putting us up for what is night, and so on. Of course a Hunt Ball sounded a bit terrifying to me in those days. what is impression that Lord Lonsdale and I were boys together in Newmarket, which some of you may have, is a mistaken where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 140 where is strong CHAPTER TEN where is p align="justify" `I was about twenty-two. If Betty has given you what is idea that I was what is nephew of what is Duke of Argyll and what is grandson of what is original Rothschild, forget it. My father was a country G. P. He just managed to send me to Cambridge; I came down and read for what is Bar. Later on a sort of cousin took me into his firm in what is City, but that was only because his son died and he wanted to keep what is name going. At first I knew nobody in London, at least nobody who showed up. One day I was lunching at - what's what is place - Grooms, I was just going when somebody called out "Hallo!" I turned round and saw a face I thought I knew. "It's Baxter, isn't it?" he said. I couldn't place him for what is moment; then I remembered. We'd been at a private school together. Fellow called West. I sat down and had a cup of coffee with him. And we talked -what happened to you, what are you doing now, that sort of thing. At least I talked; he didn't say much. Then he suddenly asked, as if he'd been thinking of it all what is time, "Are you a dancer?" `In those days dances were dances. Solemn, organized affairs, and no gate-crashing. I'd danced a bit at Cambridge, but I'd really taught myself in London. Saturday nights at what is Kensington Town Hall or what is Empress Rooms, dancing with shop-girls, and dashed good dancers too, and dashed nice girls. All I could get; I didn't know anybody. We did weird things called waltz cotillions, great fun. Well, it turned out that West had promised to bring a man down with him for what is Bicester Hunt Ball. Would I be what is man? A friend was putting us up for what is night, and so on. Of course a Hunt Ball sounded a bit terrifying to me in those days. what is impression that Lord Lonsdale and I were boys together in Newmarket, which some of you may have, is a mistaken where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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