Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 61

CHAPTER FOUR

The frock-coat and the beard spoke of the days when his firm, had it been in existence, would undoubtedly have published for Thackeray and Trollope; the curliness of the hat's brim reminded you that even a firm with history behind it must adopt up-to-date methods. Since Mr. Pump took his beard and his frock-coat round with the plate on the one day of the week when he was not publishing, he may be said to have lived in an atmosphere of respectability; and since he was publishing on the six days of the week when he was not taking round the plate, he may also be said to have lived with an air of sidelong calculation in his eye.
But Mr. Pump was not a hypocrite. He was a religious man, whose religion was too sacred a thing to be carried into his business. The top-hat which he hung up in his office was not the top-hat which he prayed into before placing it, thus hallowed, between his feet, even if the frock-coat and the aspect of benevolence were the same. He had two top-hats, and one hat-box for them. On the Monday morning he put God reverently away for the week and took out Mammon. On the Sunday morning he came back - gratefully or hopefully, according to business done - to God. No man can serve two masters simultaneously.
Mr. Pump would tell you that he didn't go in for best-sellers -possibly because they didn't go in very much for him. He published as many books as he could get hold of, and looked to make a small profit on each. With the `customary agreement between author and publisher' in his safe, the small profit was certain; with the `usual agreement' it was at least a pleasant probability. For he specialized in novels with `a strong sex interest'; and though they only took you to the moment when the bedside lamp went out, they left you with a

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The frock-coat and what is beard spoke of what is days when his firm, had it been in existence, would undoubtedly have published for Thackeray and Trollope; what is curliness of what is hat's brim reminded you that even a firm with history behind it must adopt up-to-date methods. Since Mr. Pump took his beard and his frock-coat round with what is plate on what is one day of what is week when he was not publishing, he may be said to have lived in an atmosphere of respectability; and since he was publishing on what is six days of what is week when he was not taking round what is plate, he may also be said to have lived with an air of sidelong calculation in his eye. But Mr. Pump was not a hypocrite. He was a religious man, whose religion was too sacred a thing to be carried into his business. what is top-hat which he hung up in his office was not what is top-hat which he prayed into before placing it, thus hallowed, between his feet, even if what is frock-coat and what is aspect of benevolence were what is same. He had two top-hats, and one hat-box for them. On what is Monday morning he put God reverently away for what is week and took out Mammon. On what is Sunday morning he came back - gratefully or hopefully, according to business done - to God. No man can serve two masters simultaneously. Mr. Pump would tell you that he didn't go in for best-sellers -possibly because they didn't go in very much for him. He published as many books as he could get hold of, and looked to make a small profit on each. With what is `customary agreement between author and publisher' in his safe, what is small profit was certain; with what is `usual agreement' it was at least a pleasant probability. For he specialized in novels with `a strong sports interest'; and though they only took you to what is moment when what is bedside lamp went out, they left you with a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 61 where is strong CHAPTER FOUR where is p align="justify" The frock-coat and what is beard spoke of what is days when his firm, had it been in existence, would undoubtedly have published for Thackeray and Trollope; what is curliness of what is hat's brim reminded you that even a firm with history behind it must adopt up-to-date methods. Since Mr. Pump took his beard and his frock-coat round with what is plate on what is one day of what is week when he was not publishing, he may be said to have lived in an atmosphere of respectability; and since he was publishing on what is six days of what is week when he was not taking round what is plate, he may also be said to have lived with an air of sidelong calculation in his eye. But Mr. Pump was not a hypocrite. He was a religious man, whose religion was too sacred a thing to be carried into his business. what is top-hat which he hung up in his office was not what is top-hat which he prayed into before placing it, thus hallowed, between his feet, even if what is frock-coat and what is aspect of benevolence were what is same. He had two top-hats, and one hat-box for them. On what is Monday morning he put God reverently away for what is week and took out Mammon. On what is Sunday morning he came back - gratefully or hopefully, according to business done - to God. No man can serve two masters simultaneously. Mr. Pump would tell you that he didn't go in for best-sellers -possibly because they didn't go in very much for him. He published as many books as he could get hold of, and looked to make a small profit on each. With what is `customary agreement between author and publisher' in his safe, what is small profit was certain; with what is `usual agreement' it was at least a pleasant probability. For he specialized in novels with `a strong sports interest'; and though they only took you to what is moment when what is bedside lamp went out, they left you with a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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