Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 54

CHAPTER FOUR

authority; for how little the apple-tree knows (or cares) of the processes it went through to produce the apple; how little it knows of the apple after it is grown. Raglan introduced other writers to the world; apologized for them, classified them, analysed them, collated them, cross-indexed them, rinsed them, put them through the mangle, and hung them up to dry. When he wrote of Thomas Dekker or Nicholas Breton or George Colman the younger, you felt that three more celebrities, Dekker, Breton and Colman, had now written about Raglan; that he was by that the more famous. The announcement of his edition of Hudibras as `probably Ambrose Raglan's masterpiece' left open the possibility that Butler might have written it after all, but summed up the position very fairly. You felt that if Butler were alive, he would say, `After you, my dear fellow,' as they joined the ladies. Nobody had heard of Butler but had heard of Raglan; thousands had heard of Raglan who had never heard of Butler. Whether it would be so in three hundred years' time was not yet known.
Ormsby owned newspapers and racehorses. By virtue of the former he was `Robert, first Baron Ormsby', by virtue of the latter he was `good old Bob'. He had a nose like a small button, stiff upstanding hair, a thick neck and a cleft in his chin. There was no vulgarity, no indecency, no treachery too low for his papers, but since business is business, and he had won the Derby, and smoked habitually a cigar so long that the indication of it in a cartoon was enough to identify the owner, he was a national figure, and therefore, in himself, a model of English respectability. But on one point, poor fellow, he was queer. He had this odd fancy for books.
He had asked Raglan to come and see him. Raglan came. Doubtless Ormsby was starting a new literary

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE authority; for how little what is apple-tree knows (or cares) of what is processes it went through to produce what is apple; how little it knows of what is apple after it is grown. Raglan introduced other writers to what is world; apologized for them, classified them, analysed them, collated them, cross-indexed them, rinsed them, put them through what is mangle, and hung them up to dry. When he wrote of Thomas Dekker or Nicholas Breton or George Colman what is younger, you felt that three more celebrities, Dekker, Breton and Colman, had now written about Raglan; that he was by that what is more famous. what is announcement of his edition of Hudibras as `probably Ambrose Raglan's masterpiece' left open what is possibility that Butler might have written it after all, but summed up what is position very fairly. You felt that if Butler were alive, he would say, `After you, my dear fellow,' as they joined what is ladies. Nobody had heard of Butler but had heard of Raglan; thousands had heard of Raglan who had never heard of Butler. Whether it would be so in three hundred years' time was not yet known. Ormsby owned newspapers and racehorses. By virtue of what is former he was `Robert, first Baron Ormsby', by virtue of what is latter he was `good old Bob'. He had a nose like a small button, stiff upstanding hair, a thick neck and a cleft in his chin. There was no vulgarity, no indecency, no treachery too low for his papers, but since business is business, and he had won what is Derby, and smoked habitually a cigar so long that what is indication of it in a cartoon was enough to identify what is owner, he was a national figure, and therefore, in himself, a model of English respectability. But on one point, poor fellow, he was queer. He had this odd fancy for books. He had asked Raglan to come and see him. Raglan came. Doubtless Ormsby was starting a new literary where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 54 where is strong CHAPTER FOUR where is p align="justify" authority; for how little what is apple-tree knows (or cares) of what is processes it went through to produce what is apple; how little it knows of what is apple after it is grown. Raglan introduced other writers to what is world; apologized for them, classified them, analysed them, collated them, cross-indexed them, rinsed them, put them through what is mangle, and hung them up to dry. When he wrote of Thomas Dekker or Nicholas Breton or George Colman what is younger, you felt that three more celebrities, Dekker, Breton and Colman, had now written about Raglan; that he was by that what is more famous. what is announcement of his edition of Hudibras as `probably Ambrose Raglan's masterpiece' left open what is possibility that Butler might have written it after all, but summed up what is position very fairly. You felt that if Butler were alive, he would say, `After you, my dear fellow,' as they joined what is ladies. Nobody had heard of Butler but had heard of Raglan; thousands had heard of Raglan who had never heard of Butler. Whether it would be so in three hundred years' time was not yet known. Ormsby owned newspapers and racehorses. By virtue of what is former he was `Robert, first Baron Ormsby', by virtue of what is latter he was `good old Bob'. He had a nose like a small button, stiff upstanding hair, a thick neck and a cleft in his chin. There was no vulgarity, no indecency, no treachery too low for his papers, but since business is business, and he had won what is Derby, and smoked habitually a cigar so long that what is indication of it in a cartoon was enough to identify what is owner, he was a national figure, and therefore, in himself, a model of English respectability. But on one point, poor fellow, he was queer. He had this odd fancy for books. He had asked Raglan to come and see him. Raglan came. Doubtless Ormsby was starting a new literary where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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