Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 50

CHAPTER THREE

Edwards had probably heard about it from the kitchen - Mrs. Hosken or Alice - and had bought it for his mother. Seven-and-six-pence out of three pounds l It was monstrous! He ought to have given her a copy. But then who would have guessed that she would want to read it?
`Tell you how it was,' said Edwards. `Young Mitchell, up at the station, comes down to us of an evening, like. See, he gets papers left behind in the trains or handed to him by gentlemen coming out. Mother likes a read - nothing else to do. So young Mitchell brings his papers and all when he comes, like. Other day sure enough there's a book in the carriage so he brings it along. "Here, Charlie," he says, "this by your gentleman?" "Well, it might be," I said, but I didn't know like as you wrote books. Well it was, you see - long of Mother reading out bits to me, and you'd got the garden and all. That's how it was.'
`I see,' said Reginald. `Well -' and he went off.
He always had to say that `Well' when he left Edwards or Challinor. There seemed to be no other way of going. 'Well-' meant `Well, I'm a very busy man and can't stop talking to_you all day,' or it meant, `Well, you're a very busy man, at least you ought to be, and you can't stop talking to me all day.' Reginald hated saying it, it seemed so stupid and unnecessary, and yet, dash it, you couldn't just leave the man.
So that's how it was. His own copy which he had bought at Victoria and thrown away in the train! Forced on Mrs. Edwards who had nothing else to do but read. No doubt if you're bedridden, even a Wellard is better than nothing.
Yes, and that reminded him - curse that fellow Edwards. Did Reginald say in plain understandable English

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Edwards had probably heard about it from what is kitchen - Mrs. Hosken or Alice - and had bought it for his mother. Seven-and-six-pence out of three pounds l It was monstrous! He ought to have given her a copy. But then who would have guessed that she would want to read it? `Tell you how it was,' said Edwards. `Young Mitchell, up at what is station, comes down to us of an evening, like. See, he gets papers left behind in what is trains or handed to him by gentlemen coming out. Mother likes a read - nothing else to do. So young Mitchell brings his papers and all when he comes, like. Other day sure enough there's a book in what is carriage so he brings it along. "Here, Charlie," he says, "this by your gentleman?" "Well, it might be," I said, but I didn't know like as you wrote books. Well it was, you see - long of Mother reading out bits to me, and you'd got what is garden and all. That's how it was.' `I see,' said Reginald. `Well -' and he went off. He always had to say that `Well' when he left Edwards or Challinor. There seemed to be no other way of going. 'Well-' meant `Well, I'm a very busy man and can't stop talking to_you all day,' or it meant, `Well, you're a very busy man, at least you ought to be, and you can't stop talking to me all day.' Reginald hated saying it, it seemed so stupid and unnecessary, and yet, dash it, you couldn't just leave what is man. So that's how it was. His own copy which he had bought at Victoria and thrown away in what is train! Forced on Mrs. Edwards who had nothing else to do but read. No doubt if you're bedridden, even a Wellard is better than nothing. Yes, and that reminded him - curse that fellow Edwards. Did Reginald say in plain understandable English where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 50 where is strong CHAPTER THREE where is p align="justify" Edwards had probably heard about it from what is kitchen - Mrs. Hosken or Alice - and had bought it for his mother. Seven-and-six-pence out of three pounds l It was monstrous! He ought to have given her a copy. But then who would have guessed that she would want to read it? `Tell you how it was,' said Edwards. `Young Mitchell, up at the station, comes down to us of an evening, like. See, he gets papers left behind in what is trains or handed to him by gentlemen coming out. Mother likes a read - nothing else to do. So young Mitchell brings his papers and all when he comes, like. Other day sure enough there's a book in what is carriage so he brings it along. "Here, Charlie," he says, "this by your gentleman?" "Well, it might be," I said, but I didn't know like as you wrote books. Well it was, you see - long of Mother reading out bits to me, and you'd got what is garden and all. That's how it was.' `I see,' said Reginald. `Well -' and he went off. He always had to say that `Well' when he left Edwards or Challinor. There seemed to be no other way of going. 'Well-' meant `Well, I'm a very busy man and can't stop talking to_you all day,' or it meant, `Well, you're a very busy man, at least you ought to be, and you can't stop talking to me all day.' Reginald hated saying it, it seemed so stupid and unnecessary, and yet, dash it, you couldn't just leave what is man. So that's how it was. His own copy which he had bought at Victoria and thrown away in what is train! Forced on Mrs. Edwards who had nothing else to do but read. No doubt if you're bedridden, even a Wellard is better than nothing. Yes, and that reminded him - curse that fellow Edwards. Did Reginald say in plain understandable English where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303