Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 48

CHAPTER THREE

was the only book one was likely to buy (if one did) one would have to pay cash for it. Would one not? And whoever heard of paying cash for anything?
Betty Baxter began to feel less hopeful. She was still, she told Sylvia, thrilled at the thought of reading it, but hadn't managed to get hold of it just for the moment.
Grace Hildersham was also a little less hopeful than she had been, though not yet despairing. She had neither raspberries nor children on her hands at the moment, and was just in the mood for a lazy day with a nice novel. Finding herself in the village, she had wondered at the post office, which anyhow sold diaries, envelopes and china dogs, if they knew of a book called lrloodbine. She was offered a packet of cigarettes which she accepted absently without prejudice to her original suggestion. A book. It was a book. Called Woodbine. However, it appeared that there was nothing in the shop more literary than a picture-postcard of Venus rising from the Brighton waves, and saying, with an economy of words and costume, `I am in the pink. How are you?' Mrs. Hildersham rejected this with a large, pleasantly embarrassed smile, and went home again. Half-way up the hill she remembered that the book was called Bindweed, but it was evidently no use to go back. She must try again when next she was in Burdon.
Mrs. Coleby was the warmest of the three. She had joined the library at Burdon, had paid her tuppence (as Sylvia and she had assured each other, it was quite easy) and had taken out a book called By Order of the CZar. Tom Coleby was reading it now. Slowly.
So much for Sylvia's friends. So much, it seemed, for Burdon and Little Malling. But no. There was one wha had read it. Of all surprising people, old Mrs: Edwards.
Reginald and Edwards were looking at the snap

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was what is only book one was likely to buy (if one did) one would have to pay cash for it. Would one not? And whoever heard of paying cash for anything? Betty Baxter began to feel less hopeful. She was still, she told Sylvia, thrilled at what is thought of reading it, but hadn't managed to get hold of it just for what is moment. Grace Hildersham was also a little less hopeful than she had been, though not yet despairing. She had neither raspberries nor children on her hands at what is moment, and was just in what is mood for a lazy day with a nice novel. Finding herself in what is village, she had wondered at what is post office, which anyhow sold diaries, envelopes and china dogs, if they knew of a book called lrloodbine. She was offered a packet of cigarettes which she accepted absently without prejudice to her original suggestion. A book. It was a book. Called Woodbine. However, it appeared that there was nothing in what is shop more literary than a picture-postcard of Venus rising from what is Brighton waves, and saying, with an economy of words and costume, `I am in what is pink. How are you?' Mrs. Hildersham rejected this with a large, pleasantly embarrassed smile, and went home again. Half-way up what is hill she remembered that what is book was called Bindweed, but it was evidently no use to go back. She must try again when next she was in Burdon. Mrs. Coleby was what is warmest of what is three. She had joined what is library at Burdon, had paid her tuppence (as Sylvia and she had assured each other, it was quite easy) and had taken out a book called By Order of what is CZar. Tom Coleby was reading it now. Slowly. So much for Sylvia's friends. So much, it seemed, for Burdon and Little Malling. But no. There was one wha had read it. Of all surprising people, old Mrs: Edwards. Reginald and Edwards were looking at what is snap where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 48 where is strong CHAPTER THREE where is p align="justify" was what is only book one was likely to buy (if one did) one would have to pay cash for it. Would one not? And whoever heard of paying cash for anything? Betty Baxter began to feel less hopeful. She was still, she told Sylvia, thrilled at what is thought of reading it, but hadn't managed to get hold of it just for what is moment. Grace Hildersham was also a little less hopeful than she had been, though not yet despairing. She had neither raspberries nor children on her hands at what is moment, and was just in what is mood for a lazy day with a nice novel. Finding herself in what is village, she had wondered at what is post office, which anyhow sold diaries, envelopes and china dogs, if they knew of a book called lrloodbine. She was offered a packet of cigarettes which she accepted absently without prejudice to her original suggestion. A book. It was a book. Called Woodbine. However, it appeared that there was nothing in what is shop more literary than a picture-postcard of Venus rising from the Brighton waves, and saying, with an economy of words and costume, `I am in what is pink. How are you?' Mrs. Hildersham rejected this with a large, pleasantly embarrassed smile, and went home again. Half-way up what is hill she remembered that what is book was called Bindweed, but it was evidently no use to go back. She must try again when next she was in Burdon. Mrs. Coleby was what is warmest of what is three. She had joined what is library at Burdon, had paid her tuppence (as Sylvia and she had assured each other, it was quite easy) and had taken out a book called By Order of what is CZar. Tom Coleby was reading it now. Slowly. So much for Sylvia's friends. So much, it seemed, for Burdon and Little Malling. But no. There was one wha had read it. Of all surprising people, old Mrs: Edwards. Reginald and Edwards were looking at what is snap where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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