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Page 40

CHAPTER THREE

those people who liked using the wrong word. Quaint was not actually offensive. But `amusing' with its hint of superiority was forbidden. The Baxter woman was no longer invited to Westaways.... However, she continued to come.
Westaways was a little oasis in the rolling fields, walled in to preserve its flavour. Like most cottages in this part of England it had been a farm; like most cottages it had made iron and bricks. Let other, statelier mansions claim that it was they (as undoubtedly it was) who boarded Elizabeth, hid Charles and introduced Henry to Anne. We are humbler. We merely say that we forged the last iron gates of the country-side, that we baked the first bricks. And if we are told that a good many last gates seemed to have been forged in this part of the world, a good many first bricks baked, we answer that this is not more surprising than that Elizabeth was always sleeping round about here, Charles always hiding and Henry always being introduced. In short, that there are plenty of impostors about, but that we are the genuine thing.
Westaways was within rectangular stone walls, built centuries ago as if to say to the world, `I don't care who has the rest of you, but this bit's mine.' Naturally, as soon as the wall was built, the owner found that he had spoken too quickly, and that the boundaries of the outside world might very well withdraw a hundred yards or so. The wall was now his inner fortress, a strip of land round it his moat. The barn in which Sylvia has just put the car was outside the castle walls. When the original Westaways had pulled up his drawbridge and let down the portcullis, the Morris (if he had had one) was abandoned to the enemy. In case there were still enemies about, Reginald locked up the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE those people who liked using what is wrong word. Quaint was not actually offensive. But `amusing' with its hint of superiority was forbidden. what is Baxter woman was no longer invited to Westaways.... However, she continued to come. Westaways was a little oasis in what is rolling fields, walled in to preserve its flavour. Like most cottages in this part of England it had been a farm; like most cottages it had made iron and bricks. Let other, statelier mansions claim that it was they (as undoubtedly it was) who boarded Elizabeth, hid Charles and introduced Henry to Anne. We are humbler. We merely say that we forged what is last iron gates of what is country-side, that we baked what is first bricks. And if we are told that a good many last gates seemed to have been forged in this part of what is world, a good many first bricks baked, we answer that this is not more surprising than that Elizabeth was always sleeping round about here, Charles always hiding and Henry always being introduced. In short, that there are plenty of impostors about, but that we are what is genuine thing. Westaways was within rectangular stone walls, built centuries ago as if to say to what is world, `I don't care who has what is rest of you, but this bit's mine.' Naturally, as soon as what is wall was built, what is owner found that he had spoken too quickly, and that what is boundaries of what is outside world might very well withdraw a hundred yards or so. what is wall was now his inner fortress, a strip of land round it his moat. what is barn in which Sylvia has just put what is car was outside what is castle walls. When what is original Westaways had pulled up his drawbridge and let down what is portcullis, what is Morris (if he had had one) was abandoned to what is enemy. In case there were still enemies about, Reginald locked up what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 40 where is strong CHAPTER THREE where is p align="justify" those people who liked using what is wrong word. Quaint was not actually offensive. But `amusing' with its hint of superiority was forbidden. what is Baxter woman was no longer invited to Westaways.... However, she continued to come. Westaways was a little oasis in what is rolling fields, walled in to preserve its flavour. Like most cottages in this part of England it had been a farm; like most cottages it had made iron and bricks. Let other, statelier mansions claim that it was they (as undoubtedly it was) who boarded Elizabeth, hid Charles and introduced Henry to Anne. We are humbler. We merely say that we forged what is last iron gates of what is country-side, that we baked what is first bricks. And if we are told that a good many last gates seemed to have been forged in this part of what is world, a good many first bricks baked, we answer that this is not more surprising than that Elizabeth was always sleeping round about here, Charles always hiding and Henry always being introduced. In short, that there are plenty of impostors about, but that we are what is genuine thing. Westaways was within rectangular stone walls, built centuries ago as if to say to what is world, `I don't care who has what is rest of you, but this bit's mine.' Naturally, as soon as what is wall was built, what is owner found that he had spoken too quickly, and that what is boundaries of what is outside world might very well withdraw a hundred yards or so. what is wall was now his inner fortress, a strip of land round it his moat. what is barn in which Sylvia has just put what is car was outside what is castle walls. When what is original Westaways had pulled up his drawbridge and let down what is portcullis, what is Morris (if he had had one) was abandoned to what is enemy. In case there were still enemies about, Reginald locked up what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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