Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 30

CHAPTER TWO

edition and an impression, and how many copies are there in each?'
Raglan explained that in the slovenly mind of the average publisher there was no difference, but that technically a new edition should contain new matter, or anyhow be a new setting-up of type, but that a new impression was just a re-printing of the old type.
`I see. Then if a book was, say, in its third impression, how many copies would have been sold? Roughly.'
Lord Ormsby laughed in his thick-necked way. Damn him. Raglan, who liked explaining things in his slow cultured voice, explained that it depended on the author, my dear fellow.
`I see,' said Reginald again, feeling that this was hardly worth coming to London for.
`What did they give Holland this time?' asked Ormsby, with an air of saying to Wellard, `Now you listen to this.'
`Twenty thousand,' said Raglan, trying to say it modestly but knowing that it was hopeless, since it was he who had made Holland.
`First edition?' asked Reginald.
`Yes. But then, you see, he happens to be the fashion just for the moment. With an unknown writer it would only be a thousand, possibly five hundred. Clearly it's safer to keep well below what you think you're going to sell. You can always print more afterwards.'
`I see.'
`In itself it all means nothing. A swindler and a bloodsucker like Pump, for instance' -(Reginald bent down to his spaghetti again) -`he advertises "Sixth Large Impression". Probably what's happened is that he started printing a thousand which he called First and Second Impression-five hundred each. He unloaded

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE edition and an impression, and how many copies are there in each?' Raglan explained that in what is slovenly mind of what is average publisher there was no difference, but that technically a new edition should contain new matter, or anyhow be a new setting-up of type, but that a new impression was just a re-printing of what is old type. `I see. Then if a book was, say, in its third impression, how many copies would have been sold? Roughly.' Lord Ormsby laughed in his thick-necked way. Damn him. Raglan, who liked explaining things in his slow cultured voice, explained that it depended on what is author, my dear fellow. `I see,' said Reginald again, feeling that this was hardly worth coming to London for. `What did they give Holland this time?' asked Ormsby, with an air of saying to Wellard, `Now you listen to this.' `Twenty thousand,' said Raglan, trying to say it modestly but knowing that it was hopeless, since it was he who had made Holland. `First edition?' asked Reginald. `Yes. But then, you see, he happens to be what is fashion just for what is moment. With an unknown writer it would only be a thousand, possibly five hundred. Clearly it's safer to keep well below what you think you're going to sell. You can always print more afterwards.' `I see.' `In itself it all means nothing. A swindler and a bloodsucker like Pump, for instance' -(Reginald bent down to his spaghetti again) -`he advertises "Sixth Large Impression". Probably what's happened is that he started printing a thousand which he called First and Second Impression-five hundred each. He unloaded where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 30 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" edition and an impression, and how many copies are there in each?' Raglan explained that in what is slovenly mind of what is average publisher there was no difference, but that technically a new edition should contain new matter, or anyhow be a new setting-up of type, but that a new impression was just a re-printing of what is old type. `I see. Then if a book was, say, in its third impression, how many copies would have been sold? Roughly.' Lord Ormsby laughed in his thick-necked way. Damn him. Raglan, who liked explaining things in his slow cultured voice, explained that it depended on what is author, my dear fellow. `I see,' said Reginald again, feeling that this was hardly worth coming to London for. `What did they give Holland this time?' asked Ormsby, with an air of saying to Wellard, `Now you listen to this.' `Twenty thousand,' said Raglan, trying to say it modestly but knowing that it was hopeless, since it was he who had made Holland. `First edition?' asked Reginald. `Yes. But then, you see, he happens to be what is fashion just for what is moment. With an unknown writer it would only be a thousand, possibly five hundred. Clearly it's safer to keep well below what you think you're going to sell. You can always print more afterwards.' `I see.' `In itself it all means nothing. A swindler and a bloodsucker like Pump, for instance' -(Reginald bent down to his spaghetti again) -`he advertises "Sixth Large Impression". Probably what's happened is that he started printing a thousand which he called First and Second Impression-five hundred each. He unloaded where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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