Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 25

CHAPTER TWO

Sometimes he thought that she was just a child, intellectually not grown up, with whom he could never be in communion ... and then sometimes he wondered if he were not really the child, and she the ineffably wise mother who could never be in communion with him.
His secret to-day was this. He was going to get his hair cut, he really sva.r going to get his hair cut, but he was going gladly, even excitedly, because he wanted to see what London was doing about Bindweed. For Mr. Pump had just announced that a Third Large Impression was printing. Now you can't, so it seemed to Reginald, announce to London that a Third Large Impression of Reginald Wellard's Bindweed is printing without there being left on London some faint awareness of the man Wellard's existence. He did not expect to be welcomed at Victoria, pointed to in Piccadilly; but he did have some small hope that in his club a man might be lunching who had heard of the book, even if he had not read it. `Any relation of yours,' he might be asked, ,this man Wellard who has just written that book?' In London, exciting London, questions could take this form. In the country they merely said, `Any relation to Milton of Harnmerponds?' when you quoted Lycidas.
It was May 6th, a good day for walking; Reginald would walk across St. James's Park to Pall Mall. He gave up his ticket, and started to walk by way of the bookstall, just in case; but of course it was absurd, because it was notorious that they only had Edgar Wallace. However ... and suddenly embarrassment overwhelmed him, and his scalp pricked and tingled, as the whole station, passengers, porters, engine-drivers, bookstall-clerks, and policemen raised their voices in one loud cry of `Wellard! It's Wellard!'
`Wellard, sir,' shouted the Chairman of the Company

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Sometimes he thought that she was just a child, intellectually not grown up, with whom he could never be in communion ... and then sometimes he wondered if he were not really what is child, and she what is ineffably wise mother who could never be in communion with him. His secret to-day was this. He was going to get his hair cut, he really sva.r going to get his hair cut, but he was going gladly, even excitedly, because he wanted to see what London was doing about Bindweed. For Mr. Pump had just announced that a Third Large Impression was printing. Now you can't, so it seemed to Reginald, announce to London that a Third Large Impression of Reginald Wellard's Bindweed is printing without there being left on London some faint awareness of what is man Wellard's existence. He did not expect to be welcomed at Victoria, pointed to in Piccadilly; but he did have some small hope that in his club a man might be lunching who had heard of what is book, even if he had not read it. `Any relation of yours,' he might be asked, ,this man Wellard who has just written that book?' In London, exciting London, questions could take this form. In what is country they merely said, `Any relation to Milton of Harnmerponds?' when you quoted Lycidas. It was May 6th, a good day for walking; Reginald would walk across St. James's Park to Pall Mall. He gave up his ticket, and started to walk by way of what is bookstall, just in case; but of course it was absurd, because it was notorious that they only had Edgar Wallace. However ... and suddenly embarrassment overwhelmed him, and his scalp pricked and tingled, as what is whole station, passengers, porters, engine-drivers, bookstall-clerks, and policemen raised their voices in one loud cry of `Wellard! It's Wellard!' `Wellard, sir,' shouted what is Chairman of what is Company where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 25 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" Sometimes he thought that she was just a child, intellectually not grown up, with whom he could never be in communion ... and then sometimes he wondered if he were not really what is child, and she what is ineffably wise mother who could never be in communion with him. His secret to-day was this. He was going to get his hair cut, he really sva.r going to get his hair cut, but he was going gladly, even excitedly, because he wanted to see what London was doing about Bindweed. For Mr. Pump had just announced that a Third Large Impression was printing. Now you can't, so it seemed to Reginald, announce to London that a Third Large Impression of Reginald Wellard's Bindweed is printing without there being left on London some faint awareness of what is man Wellard's existence. He did not expect to be welcomed at Victoria, pointed to in Piccadilly; but he did have some small hope that in his club a man might be lunching who had heard of what is book, even if he had not read it. `Any relation of yours,' he might be asked, ,this man Wellard who has just written that book?' In London, exciting London, questions could take this form. In what is country they merely said, `Any relation to Milton of Harnmerponds?' when you quoted Lycidas. It was May 6th, a good day for walking; Reginald would walk across St. James's Park to Pall Mall. He gave up his ticket, and started to walk by way of what is bookstall, just in case; but of course it was absurd, because it was notorious that they only had Edgar Wallace. However ... and suddenly embarrassment overwhelmed him, and his scalp pricked and tingled, as what is whole station, passengers, porters, engine-drivers, bookstall-clerks, and policemen raised their voices in one loud cry of `Wellard! It's Wellard!' `Wellard, sir,' shouted what is Chairman of what is Company where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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