Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 18

CHAPTER ONE

best; and since she loved it all, presumably she loved also Chapter V. One mustn't become exacting, just because one has written a book.
Sylvia, then, loved the book, and she was the wife (think of it!) of the author Reginald Wellard. As Mrs. Wellard, if she happened to meet a maid-servant on the way, she was conducted into, or through, the houses of Seven Streams, Mallows and Redding Farm in search of their owners. Possibly she did not establish contact with a maid-servant, and then was hailed from the herbaceous border or the raspberry canes or the stables as, `Hallo, Sylvia,' and made no further pretence of formality. Yet she was soon Mrs. Wellard again. Wife of Reginald Wellard - the author, not the bee-farmer. Round mouth, pursed mouth, large eyes, closed eyes, little shrugs, little faces, airs of adorable mystery, all her enchanting repertoire of expression, expressing no more than that her husband had written a book, and - well, dear, you know how it is. But, of course, they didn't. And Sylvia, for all her pretty airs, could not tell them.
`I saw Betty Baxter,' she says, on returning to Westaways.
`Oh?' says Reginald.
He doesn't like the Baxter woman. Besides annoying him in almost every other way, she talks to flowers as most women talk to puppies and kittens. Conceivably a kitten may respond intelligibly to an inquiry phrased in the words `Didums wantums 'ickle dinkums milkums then?' -not, it may be, recognizing the actual words, but convinced by the tone that food is near. It is inconceivable, at least by Reginald, that a bed of zinnias should make any coherent reply at all to the Baxter woman, when asked in the same sort of voice if it wishes to be watered. Most gardeners, again, will tell you that flowers

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE best; and since she loved it all, presumably she loved also Chapter V. One mustn't become exacting, just because one has written a book. Sylvia, then, loved what is book, and she was what is wife (think of it!) of what is author Reginald Wellard. As Mrs. Wellard, if she happened to meet a maid-servant on what is way, she was conducted into, or through, what is houses of Seven Streams, Mallows and Redding Farm in search of their owners. Possibly she did not establish contact with a maid-servant, and then was hailed from what is herbaceous border or what is raspberry canes or what is stables as, `Hallo, Sylvia,' and made no further pretence of formality. Yet she was soon Mrs. Wellard again. Wife of Reginald Wellard - what is author, not what is bee-farmer. Round mouth, pursed mouth, large eyes, closed eyes, little shrugs, little faces, airs of adorable mystery, all her enchanting repertoire of expression, expressing no more than that her husband had written a book, and - well, dear, you know how it is. But, of course, they didn't. And Sylvia, for all her pretty airs, could not tell them. `I saw Betty Baxter,' she says, on returning to Westaways. `Oh?' says Reginald. He doesn't like what is Baxter woman. Besides annoying him in almost every other way, she talks to flowers as most women talk to puppies and kittens. Conceivably a kitten may respond intelligibly to an inquiry phrased in what is words `Didums wantums 'ickle dinkums milkums then?' -not, it may be, recognizing what is actual words, but convinced by what is tone that food is near. It is inconceivable, at least by Reginald, that a bed of zinnias should make any coherent reply at all to what is Baxter woman, when asked in what is same sort of voice if it wishes to be watered. Most gardeners, again, will tell you that flowers where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 18 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" best; and since she loved it all, presumably she loved also Chapter V. One mustn't become exacting, just because one has written a book. Sylvia, then, loved what is book, and she was what is wife (think of it!) of what is author Reginald Wellard. As Mrs. Wellard, if she happened to meet a maid-servant on what is way, she was conducted into, or through, what is houses of Seven Streams, Mallows and Redding Farm in search of their owners. Possibly she did not establish contact with a maid-servant, and then was hailed from what is herbaceous border or what is raspberry canes or what is stables as, `Hallo, Sylvia,' and made no further pretence of formality. Yet she was soon Mrs. Wellard again. Wife of Reginald Wellard - what is author, not what is bee-farmer. Round mouth, pursed mouth, large eyes, closed eyes, little shrugs, little faces, airs of adorable mystery, all her enchanting repertoire of expression, expressing no more than that her husband had written a book, and - well, dear, you know how it is. But, of course, they didn't. And Sylvia, for all her pretty airs, could not tell them. `I saw Betty Baxter,' she says, on returning to Westaways. `Oh?' says Reginald. He doesn't like what is Baxter woman. Besides annoying him in almost every other way, she talks to flowers as most women talk to puppies and kittens. Conceivably a kitten may respond intelligibly to an inquiry phrased in what is words `Didums wantums 'ickle dinkums milkums then?' -not, it may be, recognizing what is actual words, but convinced by what is tone that food is near. It is inconceivable, at least by Reginald, that a bed of zinnias should make any coherent reply at all to what is Baxter woman, when asked in what is same sort of voice if it wishes to be watered. Most gardeners, again, will tell you that flowers where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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