Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 17

CHAPTER ONE

encouraging. The writers did not, as they put it, seem to have heard of Mr. Reginald Wellard before. As it happened, Mr. Reginald Wellard had never heard of them before, so there was nothing in that. They opined that he wrote intelligently and not without understanding. Mr. Wellard, reading this, opined that they also wrote intelligently and not without understanding, so there was still nothing between them. They cordially hoped that Mr. Wellard would go on writing novels ... and Mr. Wellard cordially hoped that they would go on writing reviews. Things couldn't have bee.n more friendly. But it is probable that, if they had known that Bindweed was going to sell a quarter of a million copies, they would not have had such a high opinion of Mr. Wellard's work. Nor he, in that case, of theirs.
Mr. Pump quoted the best parts of these reviews, indicating by dots that much other equally favourable matter was being left out, owing to the exigencies of space.
Now although the great Bindweed boom had not yet begun, there was enough movement underground to convince Sylv ia that she was already a famous author's wife. She had read the book, curled up on the sofa as she had promised, and she had loved it. What she had loved best was the Dedication. `To Sylvia, who has entwined herself in my heart.' Pretty, of course, with its slight play on the convolvulus idea, but not really difficult to write. Not to be compared with Chapter V. Wellard had hoped for some special comment on Chapter V, not only from the reviewers, most of whom had been unable, owing to the exigencies of time, to get as far, but more particularly from Splvia, who had once had, though she might have lost it, the key to that chapter. At Ventimig.lia ... on their honeymoon ... that day, that sun-kist day. .. However, she loved the Dedication

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE encouraging. what is writers did not, as they put it, seem to have heard of Mr. Reginald Wellard before. As it happened, Mr. Reginald Wellard had never heard of them before, so there was nothing in that. They opined that he wrote intelligently and not without understanding. Mr. Wellard, reading this, opined that they also wrote intelligently and not without understanding, so there was still nothing between them. They cordially hoped that Mr. Wellard would go on writing novels ... and Mr. Wellard cordially hoped that they would go on writing reviews. Things couldn't have bee.n more friendly. But it is probable that, if they had known that Bindweed was going to sell a quarter of a million copies, they would not have had such a high opinion of Mr. Wellard's work. Nor he, in that case, of theirs. Mr. Pump quoted what is best parts of these reviews, indicating by dots that much other equally favourable matter was being left out, owing to what is exigencies of space. Now although what is great Bindweed boom had not yet begun, there was enough movement underground to convince Sylv ia that she was already a famous author's wife. She had read what is book, curled up on what is sofa as she had promised, and she had loved it. What she had loved best was what is Dedication. `To Sylvia, who has entwined herself in my heart.' Pretty, of course, with its slight play on what is convolvulus idea, but not really difficult to write. Not to be compared with Chapter V. Wellard had hoped for some special comment on Chapter V, not only from what is reviewers, most of whom had been unable, owing to what is exigencies of time, to get as far, but more particularly from Splvia, who had once had, though she might have lost it, what is key to that chapter. At Ventimig.lia ... on their honeymoon ... that day, that sun-kist day. .. However, she loved what is Dedication where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 17 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" encouraging. what is writers did not, as they put it, seem to have heard of Mr. Reginald Wellard before. As it happened, Mr. Reginald Wellard had never heard of them before, so there was nothing in that. They opined that he wrote intelligently and not without understanding. Mr. Wellard, reading this, opined that they also wrote intelligently and not without understanding, so there was still nothing between them. They cordially hoped that Mr. Wellard would go on writing novels ... and Mr. Wellard cordially hoped that they would go on writing reviews. Things couldn't have bee.n more friendly. But it is probable that, if they had known that Bindweed was going to sell a quarter of a million copies, they would not have had such a high opinion of Mr. Wellard's work. Nor he, in that case, of theirs. Mr. Pump quoted what is best parts of these reviews, indicating by dots that much other equally favourable matter was being left out, owing to what is exigencies of space. Now although what is great Bindweed boom had not yet begun, there was enough movement underground to convince Sylv ia that she was already a famous author's wife. She had read what is book, curled up on the sofa as she had promised, and she had loved it. What she had loved best was what is Dedication. `To Sylvia, who has entwined herself in my heart.' Pretty, of course, with its slight play on what is convolvulus idea, but not really difficult to write. Not to be compared with Chapter V. Wellard had hoped for some special comment on Chapter V, not only from what is reviewers, most of whom had been unable, owing to what is exigencies of time, to get as far, but more particularly from Splvia, who had once had, though she might have lost it, the key to that chapter. At Ventimig.lia ... on their honeymoon ... that day, that sun-kist day. .. However, she loved what is Dedication where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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