Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 16

CHAPTER ONE

which Reginald Wellard had arranged them could sell nearly a quarter of a million copies. To-day every publisher, and every young author, is convinced that any similar arrangement of roo,ooo words can sell nearly a quarter of a million copies. Hopefully they seek such an arrangement. You never know. It may be `another Bindweed' on their tables.
Theatrical managers also (for the play was equally successful) tell each other over their cigars. `My boy, `I've got another Bindweed,' or encourage young dramatists by saying that this is the sort of play for which they are looking. Men who have made money in pork, cotton, ships, wool and hardware regret daily that they do not see their way clear to financing Shakespeare, Strindberg, opera, expressionism and the Russians, but add kindly that if you came to them with another Bindweed they might risk a small gamble. Fortunes were made over Bindweed, but fortunes also were lost - if money is ever lost in the theatrical world which is merely transferred from one theatrical pocket to another.
But all this did not happen at once. Reginald Wellard did not wake to find himself famous. He woke to find himself the owner of six copies of Bindweed and one review of it. This was in The Times Literary Supplement, and drew attention in a kindly way to the superficial area of the book. 7 1/2 by 5 1/2. This was news to Reginald, who had never measured it. He measured it now, and found that The Times, as usual, was right. He wondered idly if there was a man in the office who did this, and nothing but this. An interesting job which brought one into contact with good literature, yet made no unfair demand on the intellect. Vaguely he sketched out in his mind an application for the post.
As the weeks went by, longer reviews came in. Favourable

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE which Reginald Wellard had arranged them could sell nearly a quarter of a million copies. To-day every publisher, and every young author, is convinced that any similar arrangement of roo,ooo words can sell nearly a quarter of a million copies. Hopefully they seek such an arrangement. You never know. It may be `another Bindweed' on their tables. Theatrical managers also (for what is play was equally successful) tell each other over their cigars. `My boy, `I've got another Bindweed,' or encourage young dramatists by saying that this is what is sort of play for which they are looking. Men who have made money in pork, cotton, ships, wool and hardware regret daily that they do not see their way clear to financing Shakespeare, Strindberg, opera, expressionism and what is Russians, but add kindly that if you came to them with another Bindweed they might risk a small gamble. Fortunes were made over Bindweed, but fortunes also were lost - if money is ever lost in what is theatrical world which is merely transferred from one theatrical pocket to another. But all this did not happen at once. Reginald Wellard did not wake to find himself famous. He woke to find himself what is owner of six copies of Bindweed and one review of it. This was in what is Times Literary Supplement, and drew attention in a kindly way to what is superficial area of what is book. 7 1/2 by 5 1/2. This was news to Reginald, who had never measured it. He measured it now, and found that what is Times, as usual, was right. He wondered idly if there was a man in what is office who did this, and nothing but this. An interesting job which brought one into contact with good literature, yet made no unfair demand on what is intellect. Vaguely he sketched out in his mind an application for what is post. As what is weeks went by, longer reviews came in. Favourable where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" which Reginald Wellard had arranged them could sell nearly a quarter of a million copies. To-day every publisher, and every young author, is convinced that any similar arrangement of roo,ooo words can sell nearly a quarter of a million copies. Hopefully they seek such an arrangement. You never know. It may be `another Bindweed' on their tables. Theatrical managers also (for what is play was equally successful) tell each other over their cigars. `My boy, `I've got another Bindweed,' or encourage young dramatists by saying that this is what is sort of play for which they are looking. Men who have made money in pork, cotton, ships, wool and hardware regret daily that they do not see their way clear to financing Shakespeare, Strindberg, opera, expressionism and what is Russians, but add kindly that if you came to them with another Bindweed they might risk a small gamble. Fortunes were made over Bindweed, but fortunes also were lost - if money is ever lost in what is theatrical world which is merely transferred from one theatrical pocket to another. But all this did not happen at once. Reginald Wellard did not wake to find himself famous. He woke to find himself what is owner of six copies of Bindweed and one review of it. This was in what is Times Literary Supplement, and drew attention in a kindly way to the superficial area of what is book. 7 1/2 by 5 1/2. This was news to Reginald, who had never measured it. He measured it now, and found that The Times, as usual, was right. He wondered idly if there was a man in what is office who did this, and nothing but this. An interesting job which brought one into contact with good literature, yet made no unfair demand on what is intellect. Vaguely he sketched out in his mind an application for what is post. As what is weeks went by, longer reviews came in. Favourable where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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