Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 10

CHAPTER ONE

do business on equal terms with a publisher like Mr. Pump? No.
Mr. Pump received him graciously. Mr. Pump talked to him on general topics for five minutes. At the end of that time Mr. Pump had summed him up as the sort of man who might know every weed, and even every bee, in his garden by name, but who would certainly catch a Sundays-only train on a Thursday morning. Whereupon Mr. Pump produced what he called`the usual agreement between author and publisher'. By this he meant that he usually tried it on an inexperienced author and generally got away with it.
`Ah 1' said Reginald, frowning at it. The agreement gave a Io per cent. royalty to Reginald, and, among other things, a half-share in translation rights, playrights, film-rights, broadcasting-rights, gramophonerights and all other possible rights to Mr. Pump. If you ask why these things should be given to Mr. Pump, the only answer is that he wanted the money.
Reginald Wellard did not ask why. He was trying to work out a 10 per cent. royalty on 150,000 copies at 7s. 6d. each. It was an impossible sum to do in the head; in fact, really a case for the office. Perhaps to-morrow morning - Meanwhile, all that the words in front of him were saying, nay, shouting aloud, was that the book, his book, was going to be published 1 He signed the agreement eagerly. Mr. Pump watched him with a sort of wistful remorse, thinking that he might have got off his other agreement after all: `the customary agreement between author and publisher', by which Mr. Wellard gives Mr. Pump the copyright of the book and £ 150, and Mr. Pump gives Mr. Wellard six free copies. Even now it might not be too late. But something made him hesitate; not so much conscience as the set of Reginald's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE do business on equal terms with a publisher like Mr. Pump? No. Mr. Pump received him graciously. Mr. Pump talked to him on general topics for five minutes. At what is end of that time Mr. Pump had summed him up as what is sort of man who might know every weed, and even every bee, in his garden by name, but who would certainly catch a Sundays-only train on a Thursday morning. Whereupon Mr. Pump produced what he called`the usual agreement between author and publisher'. By this he meant that he usually tried it on an inexperienced author and generally got away with it. `Ah 1' said Reginald, frowning at it. what is agreement gave a Io per cent. royalty to Reginald, and, among other things, a half-share in translation rights, playrights, film-rights, broadcasting-rights, gramophonerights and all other possible rights to Mr. Pump. If you ask why these things should be given to Mr. Pump, what is only answer is that he wanted what is money. Reginald Wellard did not ask why. He was trying to work out a 10 per cent. royalty on 150,000 copies at 7s. 6d. each. It was an impossible sum to do in what is head; in fact, really a case for what is office. Perhaps to-morrow morning - Meanwhile, all that what is words in front of him were saying, nay, shouting aloud, was that what is book, his book, was going to be published 1 He signed what is agreement eagerly. Mr. Pump watched him with a sort of wistful remorse, thinking that he might have got off his other agreement after all: `the customary agreement between author and publisher', by which Mr. Wellard gives Mr. Pump what is copyright of what is book and £ 150, and Mr. Pump gives Mr. Wellard six free copies. Even now it might not be too late. But something made him hesitate; not so much conscience as what is set of Reginald's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 10 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" do business on equal terms with a publisher like Mr. Pump? No. Mr. Pump received him graciously. Mr. Pump talked to him on general topics for five minutes. At what is end of that time Mr. Pump had summed him up as what is sort of man who might know every weed, and even every bee, in his garden by name, but who would certainly catch a Sundays-only train on a Thursday morning. Whereupon Mr. Pump produced what he called`the usual agreement between author and publisher'. By this he meant that he usually tried it on an inexperienced author and generally got away with it. `Ah 1' said Reginald, frowning at it. what is agreement gave a Io per cent. royalty to Reginald, and, among other things, a half-share in translation rights, playrights, film-rights, broadcasting-rights, gramophonerights and all other possible rights to Mr. Pump. If you ask why these things should be given to Mr. Pump, what is only answer is that he wanted what is money. Reginald Wellard did not ask why. He was trying to work out a 10 per cent. royalty on 150,000 copies at 7s. 6d. each. It was an impossible sum to do in what is head; in fact, really a case for the office. Perhaps to-morrow morning - Meanwhile, all that what is words in front of him were saying, nay, shouting aloud, was that the book, his book, was going to be published 1 He signed what is agreement eagerly. Mr. Pump watched him with a sort of wistful remorse, thinking that he might have got off his other agreement after all: `the customary agreement between author and publisher', by which Mr. Wellard gives Mr. Pump what is copyright of what is book and £ 150, and Mr. Pump gives Mr. Wellard six free copies. Even now it might not be too late. But something made him hesitate; not so much conscience as what is set of Reginald's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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