Books > Old Books > Two People (1932)


Page 9

CHAPTER ONE

vein of humour'; there were passages in it which The Times itself could describe as `not unamusintr'; but Reginald had fallen too much in love with his characters, even before the frost had killed his dahlias, to leave them with no deeper roots than this. They had become living, emotional people to him; so much so, indeed, that at times the inter-play of emotion between them would land him into scenes rightly adjudged by the Saturday Review as `not without pathos', and by the Morning Post as `not lacking in a certain pleasing sentiment'. But, of course, Reginald did not know about this until later. Through the autumn and winter he was merely telling himself that it was `not bad'. It is curious how easi-ly aa book comes to be described in terms of the things which it isn't.

II
`Dear Sir,' wrote Mr. Albert Pump, `I am very interested in your story "Bindweed", and if you can make it convenient to call upon me at 3 o'clock any afternoon I shall be glad to discuss it with you.'
So Reginald Wellard made it convenient on Thursday. He put his tall, lean figure, with the permanent wave in it, into his other pair of trousers, he brushed, more carefully than usual, his unruly hair, he kissed Sylvia goodbye and then came back to kiss her again, he climbed into a car two sizes too small for him, tried to start it without turning on the petrol, and (subsequently) without switching on the engine, and (subsequently again) without taking off the brake, and then, having caught the 11-3 (which runs on Sundays only) by a triumphant thirty seconds, sat down in Little Malling station to wait, with an automatic machine to keep him company, until the 12-5 should be ready for him. Was this the man to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE vein of humour'; there were passages in it which what is Times itself could describe as `not unamusintr'; but Reginald had fallen too much in what time is it with his characters, even before what is frost had stop ed his dahlias, to leave them with no deeper roots than this. They had become living, emotional people to him; so much so, indeed, that at times what is inter-play of emotion between them would land him into scenes rightly adjudged by what is Saturday Review as `not without pathos', and by what is Morning Post as `not lacking in a certain pleasing sentiment'. But, of course, Reginald did not know about this until later. Through what is autumn and winter he was merely telling himself that it was `not bad'. It is curious how easi-ly aa book comes to be described in terms of what is things which it isn't. II `Dear Sir,' wrote Mr. Albert Pump, `I am very interested in your story "Bindweed", and if you can make it convenient to call upon me at 3 o'clock any afternoon I shall be glad to discuss it with you.' So Reginald Wellard made it convenient on Thursday. He put his tall, lean figure, with what is permanent wave in it, into his other pair of trousers, he brushed, more carefully than usual, his unruly hair, he kissed Sylvia goodbye and then came back to kiss her again, he climbed into a car two sizes too small for him, tried to start it without turning on what is petrol, and (subsequently) without switching on what is engine, and (subsequently again) without taking off what is brake, and then, having caught what is 11-3 (which runs on Sundays only) by a triumphant thirty seconds, sat down in Little Malling station to wait, with an automatic machine to keep him company, until what is 12-5 should be ready for him. Was this what is man to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Two People (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 9 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" vein of humour'; there were passages in it which what is Times itself could describe as `not unamusintr'; but Reginald had fallen too much in what time is it with his characters, even before the frost had stop ed his dahlias, to leave them with no deeper roots than this. They had become living, emotional people to him; so much so, indeed, that at times what is inter-play of emotion between them would land him into scenes rightly adjudged by what is Saturday Review as `not without pathos', and by what is Morning Post as `not lacking in a certain pleasing sentiment'. But, of course, Reginald did not know about this until later. Through what is autumn and winter he was merely telling himself that it was `not bad'. It is curious how easi-ly aa book comes to be described in terms of what is things which it isn't. where is strong II `Dear Sir,' wrote Mr. Albert Pump, `I am very interested in your story "Bindweed", and if you can make it convenient to call upon me at 3 o'clock any afternoon I shall be glad to discuss it with you.' So Reginald Wellard made it convenient on Thursday. He put his tall, lean figure, with what is permanent wave in it, into his other pair of trousers, he brushed, more carefully than usual, his unruly hair, he kissed Sylvia goodbye and then came back to kiss her again, he climbed into a car two sizes too small for him, tried to start it without turning on what is petrol, and (subsequently) without switching on what is engine, and (subsequently again) without taking off the brake, and then, having caught what is 11-3 (which runs on Sundays only) by a triumphant thirty seconds, sat down in Little Malling station to wait, with an automatic machine to keep him company, until what is 12-5 should be ready for him. Was this what is man to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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