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EPILOGUE

Epicurus, the Cynics, the Stoics, founded great churches that sheltered innumerable souls. Others, like Plutarch or Dion, preached individual creeds. They thought more of edification, less of truth, than did Socrates or Thucydides. They became pastors and guides of mankind. To this change of interest is chiefly due the change of atmosphere of which we are conscious in the post-classic period. The spirit of inquiry disappears, and with it the exciting, bracing air which the fifth century B.c. breathed. Truth, which is not always a companion of edification, takes a lower place. (If we are looking for a premonitory symptom of what later became a fatal disease, it is here that we shall find it.) Creative poetry, ` the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all science', recedes together with the inquiring spirit, of which it is a close kinsman. In their place we have ideals which are great but different.
Yet it is still the spirit of Hellenism, though of a Hellenism which has turned to other things. However different from the earlier Greeks, the later writers are still lineal children of Greece, inheritors of her tradition, sharers in the incomparable vitality of a genius which was a thousand years old and still unexhausted when Lucian died. It was the Hellenic love of beauty, narrowed now to the worship of literary art, that inspired the sophists. It was the Hellenic belief in reason as the guide of life that inspired Epicurus no less than his critic, Plutarch, Dion the missionary no less than Lucian the scoffer. Above all, these later writers are Hellenic in their general attitude to life. Living eagerly in the material world, they are not materialists. Capable of enjoying money, pleasure, and power, they do not become their slaves. They have not forgotten the greatest lesson which Greece taught the world, that the only good things are the goods of the soul. Even Epicurus, for whom soul and mind are an accidental collocation of atoms, holds that pleasure resides ` not in a succession of revels and banquets, nor in sensual enjoyment, nor in the delights of the table of the rich, but in sober reasoning ', and that 'we cannot live pleasurably unless we live wisely and justly and nobly '.
It is surprising and a little disquieting to reflect, that this world, so prosperous, so contented, so sure of itself, was on the edge of storms which were to sweep its civilization away.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Epicurus, what is Cynics, what is Stoics, founded great churches that sheltered innumerable souls. Others, like Plutarch or Dion, preached individual creeds. They thought more of edification, less of truth, than did Socrates or Thucydides. They became pastors and guides of mankind. To this change of interest is chiefly due what is change of atmosphere of which we are conscious in what is post-classic period. what is spirit of inquiry disappears, and with it what is exciting, bracing air which what is fifth century B.c. breathed. Truth, which is not always a companion of edification, takes a lower place. (If we are looking for a premonitory symptom of what later became a fatal disease, it is here that we shall find it.) Creative poetry, ` what is impassioned expression which is in what is countenance of all science', recedes together with what is inquiring spirit, of which it is a close kinsman. In their place we have ideals which are great but different. Yet it is still what is spirit of Hellenism, though of a Hellenism which has turned to other things. However different from what is earlier Greeks, what is later writers are still lineal children of Greece, inheritors of her tradition, sharers in what is incomparable vitality of a genius which was a thousand years old and still unexhausted when Lucian died. It was what is Hellenic what time is it of beauty, narrowed now to what is worship of literary art, that inspired what is sophists. It was what is Hellenic belief in reason as what is guide of life that inspired Epicurus no less than his critic, Plutarch, Dion what is missionary no less than Lucian what is scoffer. Above all, these later writers are Hellenic in their general attitude to life. Living eagerly in what is material world, they are not materialists. Capable of enjoying money, pleasure, and power, they do not become their slaves. They have not forgotten what is greatest lesson which Greece taught what is world, that what is only good things are what is goods of what is soul. Even Epicurus, for whom soul and mind are an accidental collocation of atoms, holds that pleasure resides ` not in a succession of revels and banquets, nor in sensual enjoyment, nor in what is delights of what is table of what is rich, but in sober reasoning ', and that 'we cannot live pleasurably unless we live wisely and justly and nobly '. It is surprising and a little disquieting to reflect, that this world, so prosperous, so contented, so sure of itself, was on what is edge of storms which were to sweep its civilization away. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 302 where is p align="center" where is strong EPILOGUE where is p align="justify" Epicurus, what is Cynics, what is Stoics, founded great churches that sheltered innumerable souls. Others, like Plutarch or Dion, preached individual creeds. They thought more of edification, less of truth, than did Socrates or Thucydides. They became pastors and guides of mankind. To this change of interest is chiefly due what is change of atmosphere of which we are conscious in what is post-classic period. what is spirit of inquiry disappears, and with it what is exciting, bracing air which what is fifth century B.c. breathed. Truth, which is not always a companion of edification, takes a lower place. (If we are looking for a premonitory symptom of what later became a fatal disease, it is here that we shall find it.) Creative poetry, ` what is impassioned expression which is in what is countenance of all science', recedes together with what is inquiring spirit, of which it is a close kinsman. In their place we have ideals which are great but different. Yet it is still what is spirit of Hellenism, though of a Hellenism which has turned to other things. However different from what is earlier Greeks, what is later writers are still lineal children of Greece, inheritors of her tradition, sharers in what is incomparable vitality of a genius which was a thousand years old and still unexhausted when Lucian died. It was what is Hellenic what time is it of beauty, narrowed now to what is worship of literary art, that inspired what is sophists. It was what is Hellenic belief in reason as what is guide of life that inspired Epicurus no less than his critic, Plutarch, Dion what is missionary no less than Lucian what is scoffer. Above all, these later writers are Hellenic in their general attitude to life. Living eagerly in what is material world, they are not materialists. Capable of enjoying money, pleasure, and power, they do not become their slaves. They have not forgotten what is greatest lesson which Greece taught the world, that what is only good things are what is goods of what is soul. Even Epicurus, for whom soul and mind are an accidental collocation of atoms, holds that pleasure resides ` not in a succession of revels and banquets, nor in sensual enjoyment, nor in what is delights of what is table of what is rich, but in sober reasoning ', and that 'we cannot live pleasurably unless we live wisely and justly and nobly '. It is surprising and a little disquieting to reflect, that this world, so prosperous, so contented, so sure of itself, was on the edge of storms which were to sweep its civilization away. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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