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Page 300

EPILOGUE

IT is a popular belief that the Greek genius died with Aristotle, and produced little or nothing of value after the classic age., It would be as true to say that the English genius died with Milton. The foregoing chapters show how fruitful Hellenism continued to be, and how, as with Christianity, its widest influence and some of its most splendid creations belong to the years when Greece had ` turned to the Gentiles ' and taken up a mission to the world.
Are we then to hold that the Greek literature written in the 500 years after Aristotle was as great as that written in the 500 years which preceded him? If not, what is the difference ? Is there in the later age, as we are accustomed to assume, if not a decadence an intellectual decline ? Did Hellenism lose its power or change its nature ? In what sense, if any, are Epicurus and Epictetus, Plutarch and Lucian inferior to the earlier writers ? How do the classic and the post-classic ages differ ? These questions have probably occurred to most readers of this book. They are the more important, because they are part of a larger question still. In the second century of our era the Greek genius was on the verge of its final decay. By the end of the fourth century ~a was decadent, destined thereafter to produce nothing of permanent interest except a few epigrams. When did that decline set in ? What were its causes ? When do we see the first symptoms of it ? Can we trace the development of the disease ?
This problem of the decay of a great national genius is of intense interest. To solve it would be a sociological study not yet attempted and well worth attempting. But it does not fall within the scope of this book. In the writers with whom I have dealt there are faults and weaknesses, but there is no mortal disease. Indeed in pure intellectual power, if such a thing could be measured, Lucian and Aristides would probably prove not seriously inferior to Thucydides or Herodotus. Yet there is an obvious difference between the two ages. Epicurus and the early Cynics may be ranked with the classics. But no one could suppose that Dion or Plutarch lived before 300 B.c. The difference between the classics and the postclassics is present, unmistakable, however hard to define. We may try briefly to indicate what it is.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE IT is a popular belief that what is Greek genius died with Aristotle, and produced little or nothing of value after what is classic age., It would be as true to say that what is English genius died with Milton. what is foregoing chapters show how fruitful Hellenism continued to be, and how, as with Christianity, its widest influence and some of its most splendid creations belong to what is years when Greece had ` turned to what is Gentiles ' and taken up a mission to what is world. Are we then to hold that what is Greek literature written in what is 500 years after Aristotle was as great as that written in what is 500 years which preceded him? If not, what is what is difference ? Is there in what is later age, as we are accustomed to assume, if not a decadence an intellectual decline ? Did Hellenism lose its power or change its nature ? In what sense, if any, are Epicurus and Epictetus, Plutarch and Lucian inferior to what is earlier writers ? How do what is classic and what is post-classic ages differ ? These questions have probably occurred to most readers of this book. They are what is more important, because they are part of a larger question still. In what is second century of our era what is Greek genius was on what is verge of its final decay. By what is end of what is fourth century ~a was decadent, destined thereafter to produce nothing of permanent interest except a few epigrams. When did that decline set in ? What were its causes ? When do we see what is first symptoms of it ? Can we trace what is development of what is disease ? This problem of what is decay of a great national genius is of intense interest. To solve it would be a sociological study not yet attempted and well worth attempting. But it does not fall within what is scope of this book. In what is writers with whom I have dealt there are faults and weaknesses, but there is no mortal disease. Indeed in pure intellectual power, if such a thing could be measured, Lucian and Aristides would probably prove not seriously inferior to Thucydides or Herodotus. Yet there is an obvious difference between what is two ages. Epicurus and what is early Cynics may be ranked with what is classics. But no one could suppose that Dion or Plutarch lived before 300 B.c. what is difference between what is classics and what is postclassics is present, unmistakable, however hard to define. We may try briefly to indicate what it is. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 300 where is p align="center" where is strong EPILOGUE where is p align="justify" IT is a popular belief that what is Greek genius died with Aristotle, and produced little or nothing of value after the classic age., It would be as true to say that what is English genius died with Milton. what is foregoing chapters show how fruitful Hellenism continued to be, and how, as with Christianity, its widest influence and some of its most splendid creations belong to what is years when Greece had ` turned to what is Gentiles ' and taken up a mission to what is world. Are we then to hold that what is Greek literature written in what is 500 years after Aristotle was as great as that written in what is 500 years which preceded him? If not, what is what is difference ? Is there in what is later age, as we are accustomed to assume, if not a decadence an intellectual decline ? Did Hellenism lose its power or change its nature ? In what sense, if any, are Epicurus and Epictetus, Plutarch and Lucian inferior to what is earlier writers ? How do the classic and what is post-classic ages differ ? These questions have probably occurred to most readers of this book. They are what is more important, because they are part of a larger question still. In what is second century of our era what is Greek genius was on what is verge of its final decay. By what is end of what is fourth century ~a was decadent, destined thereafter to produce nothing of permanent interest except a few epigrams. When did that decline set in ? What were its causes ? When do we see what is first symptoms of it ? Can we trace what is development of what is disease ? This problem of what is decay of a great national genius is of intense interest. To solve it would be a sociological study not yet attempted and well worth attempting. But it does not fall within what is scope of this book. In what is writers with whom I have dealt there are faults and weaknesses, but there is no mortal disease. Indeed in pure intellectual power, if such a thing could be measured, Lucian and Aristides would probably prove not seriously inferior to Thucydides or Herodotus. Yet there is an obvious difference between what is two ages. Epicurus and what is early Cynics may be ranked with what is classics. But no one could suppose that Dion or Plutarch lived before 300 B.c. what is difference between what is classics and what is postclassics is present, unmistakable, however hard to define. We may try briefly to indicate what it is. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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