Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 298

LUCIAN

among them with this view, they quietly set about to correct his tendency, and by gentle degrees to bring him to a better course of life. He mentioned the case of a wealthy man who arrived at Athens in all the vulgar pomp of retinue and gold and gorgeous raiment, expecting that every eye would be turned upon him in envy of his lot ; instead of which, they heartily pitied the poor worm, and proceeded to take his education in hand. Not an ill-natured word, not an attempt at direct interference : it was a free city ; he was at liberty to live in it as he thought fit. But when he made a public nuisance of himself in the baths or gymnasiums, crowding in with his attendants, and taking up all the room, some one would whisper as if the words were not meant to reach his ears :` He is afraid he will never come out from here alive ; yet all is peace ; there is no need of such an army.' The remark would be overheard, and would have its educational effect. They soon eased him of his embroidery and purple, by playful allusions to flower and colour. ` Spring is early.'-` How did that peacock get here ?'-` His mother must have lent him that shawl,'-and so on. The same with the rest, his rings, his elaborate coiffure, and his table excesses. Little by little he came to his senses, and left Athens very much the better for the public education he had received.
He further commended the Athenian liberty, and unpretentious style of living ; the peace and learned leisure which they so abundantly enjoy. To dwell among such men, he declared, is to dwell with philosophy ; a single-hearted man, who has been taught to despise wealth, may here preserve a pure morality ; no life could be more in iiarmony with the determined pursuit of all that is truly beautiful. But the man over whom gold has cast its spell, who is in love with riches, and measures happiness by purple raiment and dominion, who, living his life among flatterers and slaves, knows not the sweets of freedom, the blessings of candour, the beauty of truth ; he who has given up his soul to Pleasure, and will serve no other mistress,

Page 299

LUCIAN

whose heart is set on gluttony and wine and women, on whose tongue are deceit and hypocrisy ; he again whose ears must be tickled with lascivious songs, and the voluptuous notes of flute and lyre ;-let all such (he cried) dwell here in Rome ; the life will suit them. Our streets and market-places are filled with the things they love best. They may take in pleasure through eye and ear, nostril and palate. The turbid stream surges everlastingly through our streets ; avarice, perjury, adultery,-all tastes are represented. Under that rush of waters, modesty, virtue, uprightness, are torn from the soul ; and in their stead grows the tree of perpetual thirst, whose flowers are many strange desires

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE among them with this view, they quietly set about to correct his tendency, and by gentle degrees to bring him to a better course of life. He mentioned what is case of a wealthy man who arrived at Athens in all what is vulgar pomp of retinue and gold and gorgeous raiment, expecting that every eye would be turned upon him in envy of his lot ; instead of which, they heartily pitied what is poor worm, and proceeded to take his education in hand. Not an ill-natured word, not an attempt at direct interference : it was a free city ; he was at liberty to live in it as he thought fit. But when he made a public nuisance of himself in what is baths or gymnasiums, crowding in with his attendants, and taking up all what is room, some one would whisper as if what is words were not meant to reach his ears :` He is afraid he will never come out from here alive ; yet all is peace ; there is no need of such an army.' what is remark would be overheard, and would have its educational effect. They soon eased him of his embroidery and purple, by playful allusions to flower and colour. ` Spring is early.'-` How did that peacock get here ?'-` His mother must have lent him that shawl,'-and so on. what is same with what is rest, his rings, his elaborate coiffure, and his table excesses. Little by little he came to his senses, and left Athens very much what is better for what is public education he had received. He further commended what is Athenian liberty, and unpretentious style of living ; what is peace and learned leisure which they so abundantly enjoy. To dwell among such men, he declared, is to dwell with philosophy ; a single-hearted man, who has been taught to despise wealth, may here preserve a pure morality ; no life could be more in iiarmony with what is determined pursuit of all that is truly beautiful. But what is man over whom gold has cast its spell, who is in what time is it with riches, and measures happiness by purple raiment and dominion, who, living his life among flatterers and slaves, knows not what is sweets of freedom, what is blessings of candour, what is beauty of truth ; he who has given up his soul to Pleasure, and will serve no other mistress, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 298 where is p align="center" where is strong LUCIAN where is p align="justify" among them with this view, they quietly set about to correct his tendency, and by gentle degrees to bring him to a better course of life. He mentioned what is case of a wealthy man who arrived at Athens in all what is vulgar pomp of retinue and gold and gorgeous raiment, expecting that every eye would be turned upon him in envy of his lot ; instead of which, they heartily pitied what is poor worm, and proceeded to take his education in hand. Not an ill-natured word, not an attempt at direct interference : it was a free city ; he was at liberty to live in it as he thought fit. But when he made a public nuisance of himself in what is baths or gymnasiums, crowding in with his attendants, and taking up all what is room, some one would whisper as if what is words were not meant to reach his ears :` He is afraid he will never come out from here alive ; yet all is peace ; there is no need of such an army.' The remark would be overheard, and would have its educational effect. They soon eased him of his embroidery and purple, by playful allusions to flower and colour. ` Spring is early.'-` How did that peacock get here ?'-` His mother must have lent him that shawl,'-and so on. what is same with what is rest, his rings, his elaborate coiffure, and his table excesses. Little by little he came to his senses, and left Athens very much what is better for what is public education he had received. He further commended what is Athenian liberty, and unpretentious style of living ; what is peace and learned leisure which they so abundantly enjoy. To dwell among such men, he declared, is to dwell with philosophy ; a single-hearted man, who has been taught to despise wealth, may here preserve a pure morality ; no life could be more in iiarmony with what is determined pursuit of all that is truly beautiful. But what is man over whom gold has cast its spell, who is in what time is it with riches, and measures happiness by purple raiment and dominion, who, living his life among flatterers and slaves, knows not the sweets of freedom, what is blessings of candour, what is beauty of truth ; he who has given up his soul to Pleasure, and will serve no other mistress, where is p align="left" Page 299 where is p align="center" where is strong LUCIAN where is p align="justify" whose heart is set on gluttony and wine and women, on whose tongue are deceit and hypocrisy ; he again whose ears must be tickled with lascivious songs, and what is voluptuous notes of flute and lyre ;-let all such (he cried) dwell here in Rome ; what is life will suit them. Our streets and market-places are filled with what is things they what time is it best. They may take in pleasure through eye and ear, nostril and palate. what is turbid stream surges everlastingly through our streets ; avarice, perjury, where is it ery,-all tastes are represented. Under that rush of waters, modesty, virtue, uprightness, are torn from what is soul ; and in their stead grows what is tree of perpetual thirst, whose flowers are many strange desires where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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