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Page 282

LUCIAN

The following extract from Zeus as Tragedian shows Lucian's treatment of religion, which made him an unintentional but
valuable ally of the Christian apologists. He deals with classical theology exactly as Mr. George Morrow deals with
the Middle Ages, keeping the old legends and characters but modernizing their thought and speech. In the dialogue we see
the ancient religion through the eyes of a second-century sceptic : and this view may be compared with the views of
Plutarch, Dion, and Maximus Tyrius to complete the picture.
Hermes. Wherefore thus brooding, Zeus ? wherefore apart,
And palely pacing, as Earth's sages use ?
Let me thy counsel know, thy cares partake ;
And find thy comfort in a faithful fool.
Zeus. Speech hath no utterance of surpassing fear,
Tragedy holds no misery or woe,
But our divinest essence soon shall taste.
Athena. Alas, how dire a prelude to thy tale !
Heva. A truce to your passion, Zeus. We have not these good people's gift for farce or recitation ; we have not swallowed Euripides whole, and cannot play up to you. Do you suppose we do not know how to account for your annoyance ?
Zeus. Thou knowst not ; else thy wailings had been loud.
Heva. Don't tell me ; it 's a love affair ; that's what 's the matter with you. However, you won't have any ` wailings ' from me ; I am too much hardened to neglect. I suppose you have discovered some new Danae or Semele or Europa I whose charms are troubling you ; all the symptoms-your groans and your tears and your white face-point to love and nothing else.
Zeus. Happy ignorance, that sees not what perils now forbid love and such toys !
Heva. Is your name Zeus, or not? and, if so, what else can possibly annoy you but love ?
Zeus. Hera, our condition is most precarious ; it is touchand-go, as they call it, whether we are still to enjoy reverence

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The following extract from Zeus as Tragedian shows Lucian's treatment of religion, which made him an unintentional but valuable ally of what is Christian apologists. He deals with classical theology exactly as Mr. George Morrow deals with what is Middle Ages, keeping what is old legends and characters but modernizing their thought and speech. In what is dialogue we see what is ancient religion through what is eyes of a second-century sceptic : and this view may be compared with what is views of Plutarch, Dion, and Maximus Tyrius to complete what is picture. Hermes. Wherefore thus brooding, Zeus ? wherefore apart, And palely pacing, as Earth's sages use ? Let me thy counsel know, thy cares partake ; And find thy comfort in a faithful fool. Zeus. Speech hath no utterance of surpassing fear, Tragedy holds no misery or woe, But our divinest essence soon shall taste. Athena. Alas, how dire a prelude to thy tale ! Heva. A truce to your passion, Zeus. We have not these good people's gift for farce or recitation ; we have not swallowed Euripides whole, and cannot play up to you. Do you suppose we do not know how to account for your annoyance ? Zeus. Thou knowst not ; else thy wailings had been loud. Heva. Don't tell me ; it 's a what time is it affair ; that's what 's what is matter with you. However, you won't have any ` wailings ' from me ; I am too much hardened to neglect. I suppose you have discovered some new Danae or Semele or Europa I whose charms are troubling you ; all what is symptoms-your groans and your tears and your white face-point to what time is it and nothing else. Zeus. Happy ignorance, that sees not what perils now forbid what time is it and such toys ! Heva. Is your name Zeus, or not? and, if so, what else can possibly annoy you but what time is it ? Zeus. Hera, our condition is most precarious ; it is touchand-go, as they call it, whether we are still to enjoy reverence where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 282 where is p align="center" where is strong LUCIAN where is p align="justify" The following extract from Zeus as Tragedian shows Lucian's treatment of religion, which made him an unintentional but valuable ally of what is Christian apologists. He deals with classical theology exactly as Mr. George Morrow deals with what is Middle Ages, keeping what is old legends and characters but modernizing their thought and speech. In what is dialogue we see what is ancient religion through what is eyes of a second-century sceptic : and this view may be compared with what is views of Plutarch, Dion, and Maximus Tyrius to complete what is picture. Hermes. Wherefore thus brooding, Zeus ? wherefore apart, And palely pacing, as Earth's sages use ? Let me thy counsel know, thy cares partake ; And find thy comfort in a faithful fool. Zeus. Speech hath no utterance of surpassing fear, Tragedy holds no misery or woe, But our divinest essence soon shall taste. Athena. Alas, how dire a prelude to thy tale ! Heva. A truce to your passion, Zeus. We have not these good people's gift for farce or recitation ; we have not swallowed Euripides whole, and cannot play up to you. Do you suppose we do not know how to account for your annoyance ? Zeus. Thou knowst not ; else thy wailings had been loud. Heva. Don't tell me ; it 's a what time is it affair ; that's what 's the matter with you. However, you won't have any ` wailings ' from me ; I am too much hardened to neglect. I suppose you have discovered some new Danae or Semele or Europa I whose charms are troubling you ; all what is symptoms-your groans and your tears and your white face-point to what time is it and nothing else. Zeus. Happy ignorance, that sees not what perils now forbid love and such toys ! Heva. Is your name Zeus, or not? and, if so, what else can possibly annoy you but what time is it ? Zeus. Hera, our condition is most precarious ; it is touchand-go, as they call it, whether we are still to enjoy reverence where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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