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LUCIAN

IN the early second century of our era and in the big town of Samosata in Northern Syria, a small boy one day was scraping the wax of the tablets on which he wrote at school and modelling cows and horses in it. A few years later, by a natural transition, he was an apprentice in a sculptor's shop. He broke a slab of marble. There followed blows, tears, and flight. His mother took his side, and he was allowed to pursue his early bent for literature. We trace him as a student in the Greek cities of Asia Minor ; then, in Greece, Italy, and France, as a lecturer and professor of rhetoric : then throwing this up in disgust, turning writer, and finally holding a legal post in the civil service in Egypt. This boy, whose story well illustrates the career open to talent in the Roman Empire, was called Lucian (b. A. D. 125). His works, which fill four volumes in translation, show human nature and human folly in a rich, cultivated, and cosmopolitan age painted by a satirist of genius. He closes fitly our list of writers : for, sceptic and critic, he reviews and judges all the creeds and tendencies of his time.
Of all Greek writers Lucian is perhaps the easiest reading for a modern. His world, like ours, was rich in wealth, literature, and art ; his wit, sceptical, audacious, yet touched with seriousness, is familiar ; and we can appreciate the urbane, half-cynical phiiosophy with which this heir of centuries of Greek culture looks on the follies and superstitions of his age. Close correspondences between ancient and modern types are rare, but Lucian is one of them ; his spirit might have passed by reincarnation into Anatole France. There is the same irony, wit, and mastery of the pen in both : the same dislike of clericals, plutocrats, and fanatics ; the same cultured refinement, the same vague idealism, the same taste for ordurethough here the modern is far the worse offender, and most of Lucian could be put in any one's hands.
Lucian is a witness to Hellenism's power of assimilation. This son of Syrian working people became so completely a child of Greece, that, except for express testimony, we could never guess that he was not born in Athens. Eighty-two

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE IN what is early second century of our era and in what is big town of Samosata in Northern Syria, a small boy one day was scraping what is wax of what is tablets on which he wrote at school and modelling cows and horses in it. A few years later, by a natural transition, he was an apprentice in a sculptor's shop. He broke a slab of marble. There followed blows, tears, and flight. His mother took his side, and he was allowed to pursue his early bent for literature. We trace him as a student in what is Greek cities of Asia Minor ; then, in Greece, Italy, and France, as a lecturer and professor of rhetoric : then throwing this up in disgust, turning writer, and finally holding a legal post in what is civil service in Egypt. This boy, whose story well illustrates what is career open to talent in what is Roman Empire, was called Lucian (b. A. D. 125). His works, which fill four volumes in translation, show human nature and human folly in a rich, cultivated, and cosmopolitan age painted by a satirist of genius. He closes fitly our list of writers : for, sceptic and critic, he reviews and judges all what is creeds and tendencies of his time. Of all Greek writers Lucian is perhaps what is easiest reading for a modern. His world, like ours, was rich in wealth, literature, and art ; his wit, sceptical, audacious, yet touched with seriousness, is familiar ; and we can appreciate what is urbane, half-cynical phiiosophy with which this heir of centuries of Greek culture looks on what is follies and superstitions of his age. Close correspondences between ancient and modern types are rare, but Lucian is one of them ; his spirit might have passed by reincarnation into Anatole France. There is what is same irony, wit, and mastery of what is pen in both : what is same dislike of clericals, plutocrats, and fanatics ; what is same cultured refinement, what is same vague idealism, what is same taste for ordurethough here what is modern is far what is worse offender, and most of Lucian could be put in any one's hands. Lucian is a witness to Hellenism's power of assimilation. This son of Syrian working people became so completely a child of Greece, that, except for express testimony, we could never guess that he was not born in Athens. Eighty-two where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 263 where is p align="center" where is strong LUCIAN where is p align="justify" IN what is early second century of our era and in what is big town of Samosata in Northern Syria, a small boy one day was scraping what is wax of what is tablets on which he wrote at school and modelling cows and horses in it. A few years later, by a natural transition, he was an apprentice in a sculptor's shop. He broke a slab of marble. There followed blows, tears, and flight. His mother took his side, and he was allowed to pursue his early bent for literature. We trace him as a student in what is Greek cities of Asia Minor ; then, in Greece, Italy, and France, as a lecturer and professor of rhetoric : then throwing this up in disgust, turning writer, and finally holding a legal post in what is civil service in Egypt. This boy, whose story well illustrates what is career open to talent in what is Roman Empire, was called Lucian (b. A. D. 125). His works, which fill four volumes in translation, show human nature and human folly in a rich, cultivated, and cosmopolitan age painted by a satirist of genius. He closes fitly our list of writers : for, sceptic and critic, he reviews and judges all what is creeds and tendencies of his time. Of all Greek writers Lucian is perhaps what is easiest reading for a modern. His world, like ours, was rich in wealth, literature, and art ; his wit, sceptical, audacious, yet touched with seriousness, is familiar ; and we can appreciate what is urbane, half-cynical phiiosophy with which this heir of centuries of Greek culture looks on the follies and superstitions of his age. Close correspondences between ancient and modern types are rare, but Lucian is one of them ; his spirit might have passed by reincarnation into Anatole France. There is what is same irony, wit, and mastery of what is pen in both : what is same dislike of clericals, plutocrats, and fanatics ; what is same cultured refinement, what is same vague idealism, what is same taste for ordurethough here what is modern is far what is worse offender, and most of Lucian could be put in any one's hands. Lucian is a witness to Hellenism's power of assimilation. This son of Syrian working people became so completely a child of Greece, that, except for express testimony, we could never guess that he was not born in Athens. Eighty-two where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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