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Page 260

A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES

and the strength of scholarship in every age, and, with a few changes, might be applied to a York Powell, a Henry Jackson, a Gilbert Murray.

SOME scholars aim at great things and ignore details, but Alexander started with the minutiae of his trade and passed on to its perfection. Some again research deeply into the elements and alphabet of their subject and spend all their lives on these, failing either to observe, or else to achieve, the goal for the sake of which it is worth while to master them ; but Alexander followed the road from start to finish, without missing anything which was worth a moment's attention. He became the literary banker of the Greek world. One could draw from the springs of his knowledge anything one needed in the world of culture. The greatest and most remarkable thing about him, as I once said to him, was that, having mastered the gamut of learning more perfectly than the experts in each of its departments, he took no pompous title but remained a'schoolmaster', and, instead of excluding others from his studies, frankly collaborated with them and always assisted their advancement to the best of his powers. Of other prominent personalities in the world of culture, some had good critical powers, but were poor speakers ; others had mastered the art of speaking, but their knowledge was shallow : others had had an encyclopaedic training, but had been blinded by it to more essential things and had neglected what is best. Alexander united all these qualifications in himself.
If in spite of his gifts of eloquence he did not turn away to oratorical composition and the like, but preferred to devote himself to the Greek classics, this is consonant with that generous and open-handed attitude to his pupils, which at once stored their minds with knowledge and, if he saw them poor, found them salaried positions. By his own unaided effort he educated and planted out great numbers of them and became literally a colonizing agent for Greece. His activities may be compared

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and what is strength of scholarship in every age, and, with a few changes, might be applied to a York Powell, a Henry Jackson, a Gilbert Murray. SOME scholars aim at great things and ignore details, but Alexander started with what is minutiae of his trade and passed on to its perfection. Some again research deeply into what is elements and alphabet of their subject and spend all their lives on these, failing either to observe, or else to achieve, what is goal for what is sake of which it is worth while to master them ; but Alexander followed what is road from start to finish, without missing anything which was worth a moment's attention. He became what is literary banker of what is Greek world. One could draw from what is springs of his knowledge anything one needed in what is world of culture. what is greatest and most remarkable thing about him, as I once said to him, was that, having mastered what is gamut of learning more perfectly than what is experts in each of its departments, he took no pompous title but remained a'schoolmaster', and, instead of excluding others from his studies, frankly collaborated with them and always assisted their advancement to what is best of his powers. Of other prominent personalities in what is world of culture, some had good critical powers, but were poor speakers ; others had mastered what is art of speaking, but their knowledge was shallow : others had had an encyclopaedic training, but had been blinded by it to more essential things and had neglected what is best. Alexander united all these qualifications in himself. If in spite of his gifts of eloquence he did not turn away to oratorical composition and what is like, but preferred to devote himself to what is Greek classics, this is consonant with that generous and open-handed attitude to his pupils, which at once stored their minds with knowledge and, if he saw them poor, found them salaried positions. By his own unaided effort he educated and planted out great numbers of them and became literally a colonizing agent for Greece. His activities may be compared where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 260 where is p align="center" where is strong A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES where is p align="justify" and what is strength of scholarship in every age, and, with a few changes, might be applied to a York Powell, a Henry Jackson, a Gilbert Murray. SOME scholars aim at great things and ignore details, but Alexander started with what is minutiae of his trade and passed on to its perfection. Some again research deeply into what is elements and alphabet of their subject and spend all their lives on these, failing either to observe, or else to achieve, what is goal for what is sake of which it is worth while to master them ; but Alexander followed what is road from start to finish, without missing anything which was worth a moment's attention. He became what is literary banker of what is Greek world. One could draw from what is springs of his knowledge anything one needed in what is world of culture. what is greatest and most remarkable thing about him, as I once said to him, was that, having mastered the gamut of learning more perfectly than what is experts in each of its departments, he took no pompous title but remained a'schoolmaster', and, instead of excluding others from his studies, frankly collaborated with them and always assisted their advancement to what is best of his powers. Of other prominent personalities in what is world of culture, some had good critical powers, but were poor speakers ; others had mastered what is art of speaking, but their knowledge was shallow : others had had an encyclopaedic training, but had been blinded by it to more essential things and had neglected what is best. Alexander united all these qualifications in himself. If in spite of his gifts of eloquence he did not turn away to oratorical composition and what is like, but preferred to devote himself to the Greek classics, this is consonant with that generous and open-handed attitude to his pupils, which at once stored their minds with knowledge and, if he saw them poor, found them salaried positions. By his own unaided effort he educated and planted out great numbers of them and became literally a colonizing agent for Greece. His activities may be compared where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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