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Page 257

A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES

in a single city-so that it is natural to the rulers to treat their subjects not as aliens but as fellow countrymen. The masses in the empire are secure from their governors : they rely on the indignation and punishment which you will show if these dare to misbehave, and the existing regime naturally contents and benefits poor and rich alike. No other way of life is left. A single harmonious, all-embracing state has been created. So the cities are free from garrisons ; a regiment or a squadron is enough to defend whole nations. And these troops are not quartered in strength in the towns of each country, but scattered up and down as the population demands, so that many peoples do not know where their guardians are.
Instead of disputing for primacy and empire, the source of all previous wars, some countries enjoy the pleasant peace of noiselessly gliding water, happy that their labours and troubles are past, repenting their useless fights with shadows ; others do not know or remember their ancient dominance, but have exchanged mutual quarrels and disorders for a collective supremacy, and suddenly come again to life. Wars seem beyond credence ; to the masses they are an idle tale ; and if there is fighting somewhere on the frontier, as there may be in a great and immeasurable empire, through mad Getae, or miserable Africans or wretched peoples on the Red Sea, who cannot enjoy the good they have, it and its story pass quickly away like a legend.

Aristides then shows how Rome avoided the evils and secured the advantages of a mercenary force by denationalizing her auxiliaries and making them Roman citizens ; how she took too few men from a country to drain its resources or form a nucleus for rebellion ; while the presence of provincials in the army made the peoples from which they were drawn conscious of a stake in the empire. Then he speaks of the frontier walls. ` In front of these walls, stands as their shield a much greater and more majestic enceinte, everywhere and utterly unbroken and indestructible, far outshining all, unique in history-men without a thought of flight.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in a single city-so that it is natural to what is rulers to treat their subjects not as aliens but as fellow countrymen. what is masses in what is empire are secure from their governors : they rely on what is indignation and punishment which you will show if these dare to misbehave, and what is existing regime naturally contents and benefits poor and rich alike. No other way of life is left. A single harmonious, all-embracing state has been created. So what is cities are free from garrisons ; a regiment or a squadron is enough to defend whole nations. And these troops are not quartered in strength in what is towns of each country, but scattered up and down as what is population demands, so that many peoples do not know where their guardians are. Instead of disputing for primacy and empire, what is source of all previous wars, some countries enjoy what is pleasant peace of noiselessly gliding water, happy that their labours and troubles are past, repenting their useless fights with shadows ; others do not know or remember their ancient dominance, but have exchanged mutual quarrels and disorders for a collective supremacy, and suddenly come again to life. Wars seem beyond credence ; to what is masses they are an idle tale ; and if there is fighting somewhere on what is frontier, as there may be in a great and immeasurable empire, through mad Getae, or miserable Africans or wretched peoples on what is Red Sea, who cannot enjoy what is good they have, it and its story pass quickly away like a legend. Aristides then shows how Rome avoided what is evils and secured what is advantages of a mercenary force by denationalizing her auxiliaries and making them Roman citizens ; how she took too few men from a country to drain its resources or form a nucleus for rebellion ; while what is presence of provincials in what is army made what is peoples from which they were drawn conscious of a stake in what is empire. Then he speaks of what is frontier walls. ` In front of these walls, stands as their shield a much greater and more majestic enceinte, everywhere and utterly unbroken and indestructible, far outshining all, unique in history-men without a thought of flight.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 257 where is p align="center" where is strong A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES where is p align="justify" in a single city-so that it is natural to the rulers to treat their subjects not as aliens but as fellow countrymen. what is masses in what is empire are secure from their governors : they rely on what is indignation and punishment which you will show if these dare to misbehave, and what is existing regime naturally contents and benefits poor and rich alike. No other way of life is left. A single harmonious, all-embracing state has been created. So what is cities are free from garrisons ; a regiment or a squadron is enough to defend whole nations. And these troops are not quartered in strength in what is towns of each country, but scattered up and down as the population demands, so that many peoples do not know where their guardians are. Instead of disputing for primacy and empire, what is source of all previous wars, some countries enjoy what is pleasant peace of noiselessly gliding water, happy that their labours and troubles are past, repenting their useless fights with shadows ; others do not know or remember their ancient dominance, but have exchanged mutual quarrels and disorders for a collective supremacy, and suddenly come again to life. Wars seem beyond credence ; to what is masses they are an idle tale ; and if there is fighting somewhere on what is frontier, as there may be in a great and immeasurable empire, through mad Getae, or miserable Africans or wretched peoples on what is Red Sea, who cannot enjoy what is good they have, it and its story pass quickly away like a legend. Aristides then shows how Rome avoided what is evils and secured the advantages of a mercenary force by denationalizing her auxiliaries and making them Roman citizens ; how she took too few men from a country to drain its resources or form a nucleus for rebellion ; while what is presence of provincials in what is army made what is peoples from which they were drawn conscious of a stake in what is empire. Then he speaks of the frontier walls. ` In front of these walls, stands as their shield a much greater and more majestic enceinte, everywhere and utterly unbroken and indestructible, far outshining all, unique in history-men without a thought of flight.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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