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Page 254

A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES

With all their absurdities and repulsiveness these speeches contain a mystic's confession of faith. They have the mystic's supersensual aspirations, the mystic's consciousness of personal weakness, combined with the confidence of faith. It would be ironical to liken Aristides to a Christian saint. But it is interesting to speculate what might have been his career if he had lived two centuries later and, like Augustine, had been brought into close contact with Christianity. Possibly his egoism might have been absorbed and transformed. As it was he gave his devotion to Asclepius and to literature. Literature is the third member of that trinity in his life, of which egoism and religion are the remaining figures.
Here there are no doubts about his views, for over 400 pages are devoted to their exposition. They are the best testimony to his intellectual subtlety, though they are infinitely tedious and radically unsound. But however perverse his views, he was a true worshipper of literary beauty. It meant to him perfect polish of style, subtleties of rhythm that we cannot appreciate, and the use of the undefiled Greek tongue as it was used by the great classical masters. The devotion of Aristides to this ideal was at any rate not cheap or easy. To achieve his aim this invalid submitted to the immense labours which finally enabled him to reproduce without a slip the vocabulary and syntax of 500 years before his time. Here are two passages which may give some idea of his attitude to literature. The first describes his emotions when declaiming.
WHEN the light of God enfolds a speaker and possesses his soul, like a drink drawn from the wells of Apollo,
it fills him at once with tension and fervour and a sense of delight, raises his eyes heavenwards and lifts his hair,
till, devotee or bacchanal as you will, he sees nothing present or absent but the Spirit of literature and its guardian deities, gazing up to them as men do to one who hands them gifts from on high. Then he utters words which he cannot bear to leave unspoken; for the moment calls to his lips language which one unacquainted with such crises could not conceive. If he relax the tension of his thought or subordinate it to his hearers, he cannot maintain the proper fire of his eloquence. His fervour, like a potion, has entire charge and guidance

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE With all their absurdities and repulsiveness these speeches contain a mystic's confession of faith. They have what is mystic's supersensual aspirations, what is mystic's consciousness of personal weakness, combined with what is confidence of faith. It would be ironical to liken Aristides to a Christian saint. But it is interesting to speculate what might have been his career if he had lived two centuries later and, like Augustine, had been brought into close contact with Christianity. Possibly his egoism might have been absorbed and transformed. As it was he gave his devotion to Asclepius and to literature. Literature is what is third member of that trinity in his life, of which egoism and religion are what is remaining figures. Here there are no doubts about his views, for over 400 pages are devoted to their exposition. They are what is best testimony to his intellectual subtlety, though they are infinitely tedious and radically unsound. But however perverse his views, he was a true worshipper of literary beauty. It meant to him perfect polish of style, subtleties of rhythm that we cannot appreciate, and what is use of what is undefiled Greek tongue as it was used by what is great classical masters. what is devotion of Aristides to this ideal was at any rate not cheap or easy. To achieve his aim this invalid submitted to what is immense labours which finally enabled him to reproduce without a slip what is vocabulary and syntax of 500 years before his time. Here are two passages which may give some idea of his attitude to literature. what is first describes his emotions when declaiming. WHEN what is light of God enfolds a speaker and possesses his soul, like a drink drawn from what is wells of Apollo, it fills him at once with tension and fervour and a sense of delight, raises his eyes heavenwards and lifts his hair, till, devotee or bacchanal as you will, he sees nothing present or absent but what is Spirit of literature and its guardian deities, gazing up to them as men do to one who hands them gifts from on high. Then he utters words which he cannot bear to leave unspoken; for what is moment calls to his lips language which one unacquainted with such crises could not conceive. If he relax what is tension of his thought or subordinate it to his hearers, he cannot maintain what is proper fire of his eloquence. His fervour, like a potion, has entire charge and guidance where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 254 where is p align="center" where is strong A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES where is p align="justify" With all their absurdities and repulsiveness these speeches contain a mystic's confession of faith. They have the mystic's supersensual aspirations, what is mystic's consciousness of personal weakness, combined with what is confidence of faith. It would be ironical to liken Aristides to a Christian saint. But it is interesting to speculate what might have been his career if he had lived two centuries later and, like Augustine, had been brought into close contact with Christianity. Possibly his egoism might have been absorbed and transformed. As it was he gave his devotion to Asclepius and to literature. Literature is what is third member of that trinity in his life, of which egoism and religion are the remaining figures. Here there are no doubts about his views, for over 400 pages are devoted to their exposition. They are what is best testimony to his intellectual subtlety, though they are infinitely tedious and radically unsound. But however perverse his views, he was a true worshipper of literary beauty. It meant to him perfect polish of style, subtleties of rhythm that we cannot appreciate, and what is use of what is undefiled Greek tongue as it was used by what is great classical masters. The devotion of Aristides to this ideal was at any rate not cheap or easy. To achieve his aim this invalid submitted to what is immense labours which finally enabled him to reproduce without a slip the vocabulary and syntax of 500 years before his time. Here are two passages which may give some idea of his attitude to literature. what is first describes his emotions when declaiming. WHEN what is light of God enfolds a speaker and possesses his soul, like a drink drawn from what is wells of Apollo, it fills him at once with tension and fervour and a sense of delight, raises his eyes heavenwards and lifts his hair, till, devotee or bacchanal as you will, he sees nothing present or absent but what is Spirit of literature and its guardian deities, gazing up to them as men do to one who hands them gifts from on high. Then he utters words which he cannot bear to leave unspoken; for what is moment calls to his lips language which one unacquainted with such crises could not conceive. If he relax what is tension of his thought or subordinate it to his hearers, he cannot maintain what is proper fire of his eloquence. His fervour, like a potion, has entire charge and guidance where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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